Partisanship

Kevin Light / Reuters

How I Left B.C's Toxic Partisanship Behind

Behind the politics, the rhetoric, the spin and the muckraking, there are people. People of passion and who desire to fight for what they believe in. If we cannot build bridges and learn to understand those with whom we most deeply disagree, we will never be able to come together and change things in this province.
CP

For The Federal NDP: Power Or Purpose, Which Is It?

The belief in a fairer and more just world, never fully prioritized by the other parties, has been the shining "city on a hill" for the NDP for decades and remains a stirring vision. It still sustains them as they move forward and Canadians still require their outlook. The question is: will it remain their principal and overriding passion or will their recent nearness to power have them seeking more power than purpose?
CP

Del Mastro Isn't the Problem, Politics Is

He looked at me through moist eyes and wanted me to know how delighted he was that our adopted kids from South Sudan had arrived and were seated in the visitor's gallery above the parliamentary chamber. Question Period had just concluded and his face had been a mixture of anger, mockery and clear disdain the entire time, and yet here he was, one of Stephen Harper's attack dogs, fighting back tears and being touchingly human.These thoughts came back to me as I watched the video of Dean Del Mastro being led into a paddy wagon following his conviction for electoral fraud in the 2008 federal election.

One Issue Makes MPs Ditch Partisanship

One of the topics that seems to bring MPs -- and Canadians as a whole -- together is a belief in small business. According to an Angus Reid survey that the Canadian Federation of Independent Business (CFIB) commissioned last year with HP Canada and Intel Canada, 98 per cent of Canadians said that small business is important to Canada's future.
CP

2012: Canadian Politics Was a Game of Tomato, Tomahto

If voters sit down and scrutinize the political and economic policy proposals put forth by each party in 2012, it becomes apparent that it is nearly impossible to tell where one party stops and another begins. So unless you sit slightly to the right -- in which case every party embodies your politics -- the next time a canvasser, pollster, government official, or public figure asks, "which political party do you support?" consider responding "none of them." Can you really be considered apathetic?

Canada's Own Game of Thrones

In many ways, Game of Thrones is increasingly finding its modern equivalent in federal partisanship, and perhaps more and more in politics in general in Canada. In what was more or less a united land, one party has become dominant.