Patient Safety

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You Can and Should Ask These Questions Before Consenting to Surgery

As a patient, you are entitled to a full discussion with your surgeon about the potential benefits -- and risks -- of an operation before you give consent to the treatment. "Patients certainly shouldn't feel intimidated or concerned about asking questions. It is ultimately their health that is at stake," says Sally Bean, a Policy Advisor and Ethicist at Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre. In my experience, most surgeons are quite happy to discuss those types of things with you." So, to answer your question, it is okay to ask a doctor how often he or she has performed the procedure.
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Quiet Heroes Are Making Hospitals Safer

Visit any major city in North America and you will quickly discover the link between cash and name recognition in healthcare. Some rich person gives a few million to an urban hospital and their name goes up on a wing. Recently, a generous $3 million donation to Toronto's Mount Sinai Hospital was celebrated in a full-page advertisement in Canada's national newspape
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Why We Need To Speak Up For Safer Care in Hospitals

Nobody takes on a hospital or embarks on a campaign for safer care without good reason. There are a whole range of institutions and resources that are stacked against you, from big law firms to hospital patient relations departments which are there mainly to do management's bidding. Don't even think about trying to get anywhere with a hospital's board of directors. There seems to be some unwritten rule in Canada that no matter how urgent or justified the matter, a hospital board will never respond to the pleas of a family seeking answers.
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When Hospitals Do More Harm Than Good

There is a medical emergency rolling across the land and into its hospital rooms. It is the epidemic of hospital medical errors that is literally killing thousands of patients each year. There are numerous reasons that have been put forth as to why there continue to be so many medical errors. Perhaps what is required is not a no-fault culture, but one where it actually becomes unlawful not to report medical errors.