PETER WORTHINGTON

EXCERPT: The Spy I Brought in From the Cold

For some time, Olga had been talking in riddles, dropping hints, making provocative comments. Once when I had remarked on her relatively good life in Moscow, she replied: "It is better to be a free sparrow than a caged canary." I had ignored all hints, aware they might be a trap.

What I Learned About Life From my Father's Death

People will say Peter Worthington faced death bravely, and he did. But he also faced it with that same curiosity that led him to run away and enlist in WW2 and again in Korea; that eventually led him to every major crisis and hotspot of the second half of the 20th century; to the farthest places of the earth; to the most interesting people on the planet; and sometimes, simply, just to see what something felt like, such as jack-knifing off a cliff.
AOL Canada

"If You Are Reading This, I Am Dead": Peter Worthington's Self-Penned Obituary

If you are reading this, I am dead. How's that for a lead? Guarantees you read on, at least for a bit. After attending George Gross's funeral in 2008 I half-facetiously remarked to the Toronto Sun's deputy managing editor, Al Parker, that I had been around so long that no one was left who knew me back then, and I had better write my own obituary. "Good idea!" said Parker with more enthusiasm than I appreciated. So here it is, not exactly an obit but a reflection back on a life and a career that I had never planned, but which unfolded in a way that I've never regretted.
Toronto Sun

Publishing Icon Dies At 86

TORONTO, Ontario -- Peter Worthington, the veteran newspaperman who co-founded the Toronto Sun, has died. He was 86. His wife, Yvonne Crittenden, confirmed that her husband died on Sunday night. The T...
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The Column You'd Never Expect Me To Have Written

I was chatting with the National Post's Andrew Coyne and a bunch of others at a party last weekend, and he mentioned a column I'd written for the old Financial Post that drew more response than anything the paper had experienced at that time. And you would never believe what the column was about.
Jan Wong/George Whiteside

Globe's Reaction to Jan Wong Depression Put Journalism in a Sad Place

Jan Wong was one of Canada's ace reporters. She won readers and admirers for the Globe and Mail. Then suddenly, a couple of years ago, she vanished from the pages of her paper. Why? Because she suffered from depression, and management refused to acknowledge the fact; they thought she was just being lazy. One has some sympathy with the Globe's misunderstanding, but it's come at the cost of the thinning of the ranks of honest frontline journalism.