Prescription Drug Costs

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Why Do Cancer Drugs Cost More Than Gold?

A decade ago, the average bill for a cancer patient's drugs amounted to $2,000 or $3,000 a month, says Dr. Maureen Trudeau, head of medical oncology and hematology at Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre. "Now some of the medications cost $6,000, $8,000 or $10,000 a month," she says. Despite their big price tags, a lot of newer drugs don't actually cure cancer. They simply help the patient to live longer -- sometimes by just a few months -- or will ease the discomfort caused by the disease.
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Canadians Should Not Shoulder Prescription Drug Costs

Cities have to spend this money, taken from local taxpayers, because Canada's medicare system is the only universal, public health care system among developed countries that does not include universal coverage of prescription drugs. It is not wrong for cities to care for their employees. But leaving these costs to the cities makes about as much sense as requiring every homeowner to maintain the roads and infrastructure surrounding their property. Here's why.