Prescription Drugs

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Canada Must Follow Ontario's Pharmacare Example

Ontario has been the site of dueling pharmacare proposals and Canadians are the victors. At the end of April, the opposition NDP promised universal drug coverage for a list of essential medicines. Not to be outdone, the ruling Liberal party announced universal coverage for all drugs on the provincial formulary for youth under 25 years of age. Most health policy experts praised both proposals, myself included.
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4 Reasons Canada Needs Universal Pharmacare Now

Several national commissions on Canada's health care system have recommended adding prescription drugs to our publicly funded universal medicare system. No federal government has ever acted on those recommendations. Not yet, anyhow. By creating 'pharmacare-junior,' Premier Wynne and Minister Hoskins are in essence calling on the federal government to help finish the job and create a pharmacare program for all Canadians of all ages.
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How Much Health Care Is Too Much?

Unnecessary care could be a prescription drug, a diagnostic test or a medical procedure that does not improve a patient's health outcomes and is not backed by the best available evidence. It may also involve risks and harmful side-effects. In other words, this is medical care that offers no value to patients and strains health care resources.
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The Problem With Adderall

Adderall can affect your body in a number of ways. Short-term, students who take Adderall experience feelings of nervousness, nausea and agitation. Since the drug maintains your focus, it inadvertently eliminates your appetite. Consequently, students often miss important meals after taking the drug. Abuse of the drug has been linked to eating disorders and other associated mental health issues.
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Is Health Care Finally Becoming the Election Issue it Should Be?

National drug coverage has long been a priority for the more than one in five Canadian households that can't afford to buy needed prescription medicines. But in spite of decades of calls for a new program, the idea seemed not ready for primetime. The cost of national pharmacare was seen to be too great in a time of low political appetite for new universal benefits. But it turns out that pharmacare isn't a money sucker -- it's a money saver.
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Why Do Cancer Drugs Cost More Than Gold?

A decade ago, the average bill for a cancer patient's drugs amounted to $2,000 or $3,000 a month, says Dr. Maureen Trudeau, head of medical oncology and hematology at Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre. "Now some of the medications cost $6,000, $8,000 or $10,000 a month," she says. Despite their big price tags, a lot of newer drugs don't actually cure cancer. They simply help the patient to live longer -- sometimes by just a few months -- or will ease the discomfort caused by the disease.