Prevention

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10 Everyday Ways to Lower Your Risk of Cancer

There are many factors we can't control that affect our cancer risk, like growing older, our genetic profile and having a family history of the disease. But the good news is that there is a lot we can control. It's as simple as making healthy choices every day and having policies in place that protect our health. Here are the top 10 ways to lower your risk of cancer.
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Tired of Feeling Sick and Tired? It's Time to Start Juicing

Hodish warns that while the nutritional benefits of juicing far outweigh the hassle of preparing a freshly squeezed drink, it's still a lot of work. "Juicing is a task. It takes time," he says. To be more efficient, Hodish makes all of his juice in the morning -- it takes about one pound of produce to yield a single serving -- and stores it in mason jars to prevent it from oxidizing.
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Sit Less, Live Longer

It is often hard to believe how different life is today for our kids than it was for us. Even though I am 41, I still have many stories that begin with, "When I was your age...". But the truth is when I was young, we walked or biked everywhere, we didn't have electronic devices beyond a Walkman, and you had to get out of your vehicle to get a coffee or lunch.
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Making Strides On World Cancer Day

February 4 was world cancer day. For the average cancer patient or survivor, it brings up mixed emotions. It's not really something we want to think about, but we can't really help it, with all the newspaper and television headlines there to remind us.

The Politics of Bullying

The last couple months have taught me a lot about youth, bullying and the politics of it all. As I tell the youth, I am "just a guy named Tad" and I am not an expert or professional on this topic at all. Having reflected on this recently, I believe it is safe to say that I do know a lot about bullying however, directly from the source ... the youth.
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Tips for Staying Healthy During the Holiday Party Season

Stay home when you are sick. It's the right thing to do for everyone, including you, because when your immunity is low you can pick up other germs more easily... yuck. Steep some tea, pour a bowl of soup, crank up the vitamins and rest, allowing your body to heal. Don't let stress undermine a quick recovery and try and enjoy your forced time out.
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VIDEO: Top 5 Flu Fighting Remedies

You'd think by now we would be aware enough about "cold and flu season" to start acting well in advance to stay on our game -- our health game, that is. Whether you get the vaccine or not is your choice, but real prevention will always be your best defence. Today on Meghan TV, our functional medicine specialist Josh Gitalis shares his top five Flu Fighting Remedies.
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Can What You Eat Really Help You Fight Off Disease?

When we eat a healthy diet of fruits, vegetables, whole grains and lean protein, we feel better, have increased energy and improve our immune system. Here are my favourite picks of delicious affordable foods that can help fight chronic disease. And the bonus is that nutrient dense food tastes great!
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Could This Computer Game Save Your Kids From Fire?

Could an interactive computer game teach younger children about how to stay safe in a fire? An interactive computer game titled "The Great Escape" was developed by Winnipeg firefighter Shane Ferguson as part of the Staying Alive program. Ferguson had created the program and game as a tribute to five-year old Laura Johnson. He had been one of first responders of the scene to discover her body after she died of smoke inhalation in a 1998 house fire.
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Healthy Aging: Exercising the Body Benefits the Mind, Too

While regular physical activity has long been regarded as an important component of healthy aging, its impact on mental health has remained less explored -- until now. Several new studies on the role of exercise for the prevention of mental decline in older adults have been presented at this year's Alzheimer's Association International Conference (AAIC) in Vancouver, Canada.
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PSA Test: What Some Doctors Don't Want You to Know

Let me try and boil down what the United States Preventive Services Task Force really is saying about PSA tests: Don't worry, be happy and oblivious. Because the treatment's after-effects can be rough. Don't worry, be happy, do nothing -- even though many of us know someone who has died young from prostate cancer.