Canada Privacy

Tech Company Innovation Outweighs Policy Headaches

Saeed Selvam | Posted 04.15.2015 | Canada Business
Saeed Selvam

Tech giants like Google, Facebook, Uber and Airbnb have entered unchartered policy territory where ethics debates, grey areas and government relations are the daily norm. While the seeming nuisance of having to deal with all these new policy implications all at once may seem cumbersome, the economic benefits and progress that has been made far outweigh the work.

What You'll Have to Do to Stay Under the Radar if Bill C-51 Becomes Law

Susan Wright | Posted 03.22.2015 | Canada Politics
Susan Wright

Bill C-51 is an omnibus anti-terrorism bill that grants CSIS new information sharing powers and converts CSIS from a covert intelligence gathering organization to a covert enforcement agency. Ms. Soapbox is here to offer four simple suggestions to keep you out of trouble when Stephen Harper's majority government finally passes this monstrous piece of legislation.

If You Could Speak at the Bill C-51 Hearing, What Would You Say?

Eva Prkachin | Posted 03.18.2015 | Canada Politics
Eva Prkachin

Our own Steve Anderson has been invited to testify before the committee and share our community's concerns about C-51 with key decision makers. We know that when we speak out together with one voice we can change the government's mind. That's why we need your help right now.

Are You Obligated to Provide Your Password at the Border?

Kris Constable | Posted 03.10.2015 | Canada Politics
Kris Constable

There are already some technical experts suggesting you use duress passwords that wipe your device, but I would not recommend that -- that could have negative affects if you are considered to be tampering with evidence, or obstruction. I suggest you are better off in a position where you do not know your password, or exercise silence if in Canada.

Better Late Than Never: Politicians Are Speaking up Against Bill C-51

Eva Prkachin | Posted 04.17.2015 | Canada Politics
Eva Prkachin

Huge numbers of Canadians, including key Ottawa decision-makers, are pushing back hard against the government's Bill C-51, which proposes unprecedented new powers for Canada's security agencies. The bill effectively turns CSIS into a secret police force and would place every Canadian under a government microscope.

How to Tackle Canada's Privacy Deficit

David Christopher | Posted 04.07.2015 | Canada Politics
David Christopher

Anyone can be a victim of surveillance. If you've used any of over a hundred popular file-hosting websites in the past three years, chances are you've had your online activity collected and analyzed by CSEC, acting without a warrant and with no independent oversight. There is a great deal that can be done to tackle our privacy deficit.

Harper's New 'Anti-Terrorism' Bill Will Create a Climate of Self-Censorship

Peter Nowak | Posted 04.06.2015 | Canada Politics
Peter Nowak

The Harper government's newly introduced "anti-terrorism" legislature, Bill C-51, has been roundly condemned as an assault on privacy and free speech -- and rightly so. Besides hunting down would-be terrorists, the new laws could be used to stifle dissent, remove due process and lead to the creation of a secret police force, critics say. In a supposedly enlightened and democratic country such as Canada, these would be unwelcome developments to say the least. But there is a deeper cost to eroding privacy than just the spurring of undesirable changes in external entities such as courts and communications networks. Also at stake is the very freedom of Canadians to internally determine who they are and want to be.

Just Clicking on a Link Could Make You a Target For In-Depth Government Surveillance

Eva Prkachin | Posted 04.02.2015 | Canada Politics
Eva Prkachin

Even more disturbing, it seems that CSE deliberately targeted Canadian IP addresses in violation of the law and contrary to repeated government assurances. They then cross-referenced the IP addresses of file-hosting users with other databases to learn the identity of these users. So basically, ending up as a target for in-depth surveillance could be as easy as clicking on a link.

Privacy Violations On Upswing In B.C.: Watchdog Report

CP | Dirk Meissner, The Canadian Press | Posted 03.30.2015 | Canada British Columbia

B.C.'s privacy watchdog is calling for improved teamwork between the government and her office.

Why Did the Liberals Vote For Bill C-13 After Fiercely Opposing It?

Eva Prkachin | Posted 03.25.2015 | Canada Politics
Eva Prkachin

Like an overwhelming number of Canadians, you said -- publicly -- that you didn't want to grant telecom providers immunity for handing over our sensitive private information to government without a warrant. But then at the last minute something changed. You voted for the Bill in Parliament, and I don't mind telling you that was a huge disappointment. I also can't help but detect a hint of shame in the blog post that you wrote explaining why you turned around and supported the Bill after speaking out so vociferously against it.

Who Has Access to Your HIV Test Results?

Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre | Posted 03.24.2015 | Canada Living
Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre

Q: "I was wondering who is able to access Ontario Ministry of Health lab records. I did a series of tests for a needle-stick injury, and was recently told that I could be discriminated against for a job in public health or insurance. When I looked it up on-line, it appears that insurance companies can access lab records. Is this true?"

We Need To Fight For a Free and Open Internet in 2015

David Christopher | Posted 03.08.2015 | Canada Politics
David Christopher

Do we want an Internet that works for everyday citizens -- or one dominated by powerful bureaucracies, be they spy agencies, giant telecom conglomerates, or powerful Hollywood lobbyists? If we want a free and open Internet that works for all of us then we're going to have to fight for it.

Bill Cosby's Signature Tells Us More About Him Than You Think

Annette Poizner | Posted 01.28.2015 | Canada Living
Annette Poizner

The first letter of his surname has been distorted and made into an overarching awning which protects the surname, representing the public self or the professional self. In fact, some of the letters of the last name are tucked away, hidden beneath that dominant arcade, as if tucked away from public view. What do we know about Bill Cosby's private life?

At This Point Is Wearable Tech More About Fashion or Function?

Elaine Mah | Posted 01.27.2015 | Canada Business
Elaine Mah

Wearables are running the gamut: technology that can boost activity, keep you connected, and at the end of the day, help you unwind. While I was amazed by the solutions being showcased at Wearable Entertainment and Sports Toronto, the conference left me with more questions than answers about the bigger role of wearable technology in society.

Now, More Than Ever, Canada Must Remain Free and Open

Josh Tabish | Posted 12.26.2014 | Canada Politics
Josh Tabish

It has never been clearer that Canada has a growing privacy deficit that needs to be addressed. Unless we work together, we could end up with a society that's more spied on and policed than ever before.

Harper's 'Revenge Porn' Bill Agenda Does Very Little To Protect Innocents

Reut Amit | Posted 12.21.2014 | Canada Politics
Reut Amit

It's not cyber-bullying, it's cyber-rape. Imagine you receive an email containing a naked picture of you in a sexual position. You remember, that one that you sent your lover. The email is linked to a site where more images of your naked and vulnerable body are displayed followed by hateful comments, complete strangers tearing you apart, a cybermob virtually raping you. The site includes your full name, your home address, your contact information. Some of the commenters threaten to come to your home and rape you.

When Boundaries Are Healthy

Kim Smiley | Posted 11.19.2014 | Canada Living
Kim Smiley

I know, in the internet age, many people think boundaries are passé. This is clear to me when I contemplate people's selfies on social media and their transgressions on Twitter. But I want to reframe the discussion to show that boundaries can be healthy. So let's explore some of the benefits.

I Can Keep a Secret, Can You?

Kim Smiley | Posted 11.13.2014 | Canada Living
Kim Smiley

As a girl, a wise woman told me my eyes would elicit people's secrets throughout my life. I took her words to heart. From that day forward, I resolved to be a gatekeeper not a gossiper, and in some mystical way, like a magnetic field, her prophecy came true.

Back to School Social Media Rules for Parents and Kids

Jeff Quipp | Posted 11.04.2014 | Canada Living
Jeff Quipp

With the school year back in full swing, it's a great time to revisit a topic that affects students, parents and teachers equally: social media. While social media use continues to grow and becomes increasingly common place, it is nonetheless an area of contention, particularly when it comes to kids -- both in and outside of the classroom.

Why Does It Take Jennifer Lawrence's Nude Photo To Spark Outrage on Privacy Issues?

Lauren Messervey | Posted 11.01.2014 | Canada Living
Lauren Messervey

But a new battle is raging, and as pleased as I am to see so many people outraged by a young actress' right to sexual privacy being violated, I can't help but ask; why such an outcry for Jennifer Lawrence? It has always been disgusting to see so many young women, celebrity or no, be abused by the absurdity of non-consensual pornography, so why are we choosing to be outraged now? Shouldn't we have brought this up a long time ago?

Facebook Messenger Permissions Come Down To Trust

Kris Constable | Posted 10.15.2014 | Canada British Columbia
Kris Constable

The risk is, we don't know when Facebook, or any app, actually uses these permissions, and I don't think we want to find out after-the-fact that it's been recording me since I installed it, just to sell to advertisers. So until Google improves the Android architecture by allowing us more control over what permissions an app can access at any given time, it comes down to trust.

Government Spy Agencies Have Too Much Latitude

Amira Elghawaby | Posted 09.28.2014 | Canada Politics
Amira Elghawaby

Global attitudes on spying shift dramatically when the targets of the state's vast monitoring apparatus are suspected terrorists. Not surprisingly, a majority agree that it's acceptable to scrutinize the communications of those who would potentially do harm. Unfortunately, though, our governments have failed to show that they are capable of doing the job with care and precision.

Peter MacKay's Privacy Deficit Turned These Lives Upside Down

David Christopher | Posted 09.17.2014 | Canada Politics
David Christopher

Minister MacKay's lack of respect for Canadians is symptomatic of a government with a terrible track record on privacy issues. They continue to resist calls to take common sense steps to rein in Canada's out-of-control spy agency CSEC -- an agency that just 8 per cent of Canadians trust with their private information, according to a recent poll. The CSEC was caught red-handed collecting hugely sensitive information about law-abiding Canadian air travellers, and storing our private information in giant, insecure databases to be shared with their U.S. partners at the NSA.

The Conservative Government Just Doesn't Get It When It Comes To Privacy

Steve E. Anderson | Posted 09.07.2014 | Canada Politics
Steve E. Anderson

There are few rights more important in any healthy democracy than the right to privacy. When citizens believe they are being watched, their willingness to engage in democratic debate is eroded, which in turn undermines our whole democratic process. Yet we clearly have a privacy deficit in this country.

Two Bills Later, Political Parties Can Still Collect Your Info Scot-Free

Vincent Gogolek | Posted 08.24.2014 | Canada Politics
Vincent Gogolek

Are you worried about what federal political parties are doing with their ever-growing stashes of your personal information? Because you should be. Federal political parties' databases and all the personal information they contain are still not subject to any law (except for some information related to the voters register).