Profit

Connecting to Compete: Logistics Management

Umar Zulqarnain | Posted 09.12.2014 | Canada Business
Umar Zulqarnain

Building and managing a world-class supply chain is difficult regardless the economic climate. Transporting goods quickly and efficiently is a complex task that requires coordinating and managing a number of variables within a fast-paced and volatile environment.

The Benefits of Carbon Shadow Pricing

Tyler Elm | Posted 12.22.2012 | Canada Business
Tyler Elm

Placing a price on carbon of anywhere from $10 to $80 a tonne can have a profound effect on business planning. It can help a company cut costs, while dramatically reducing its risk and exposure to rising energy prices and a price being put on carbon. Which brings us to an important question...

How Sustainability Can Save Business

Jim Harris | Posted 11.18.2012 | Canada Business
Jim Harris

Decades of experience have shown that environmental initiatives pursued in isolation of the economic benefit are largely immaterial. But when environmental objectives are framed as business strategy and tied to business operations and measured in terms of cutting cost and increasing profitability -- significant environmental benefits are generated. And so we believe that environmentalism can save business, as the more powerful engagement tool that business has at its disposal to drive innovation.

A Business Tip From a Country Boy: Invest in People

Mary Donohue | Posted 11.12.2012 | Canada Business
Mary Donohue

Bill Clinton at the DNC said what white- and blue-collar workers have known for 30 years: you need to invest in people to have an innovative and productive economy. My coach, used to say "you get corn, if you plant corn." Neither in government nor in business have we been planting corn. We quit planting it almost 30 years ago when we got rid of middle management in government and the private sector, and as the economy reveals, we are losing.

Watching the Watchdog: Saving Canadian Journalism From Itself

Tim Knight | Posted 10.29.2012 | Canada
Tim Knight

Slowly, slowly, the dwindling band of journalists who survive all the cuts are being acclimatized to the notion that their job is no longer to serve the people in our democracy -- a tradition proudly built up over the past couple of hundred years, often at great cost -- but to serve their employer. So why don't we, the people, take over -- subsidize our precious democratic journalism ourselves? Here's the plan.