Propaganda

Ben Nelms / Reuters

Justin Trudeau And The Goldilocks Syndrome

While it might not be noticed at first glance, proper arguing has a moral component to it: One shouldn't convince people with tricks of language. This apparently wasn't a lesson learned by our prime minister during his university days. In fact, it's now quite obvious Mr. Trudeau thinks he's quite within his rights as prime minister to use fallacious reasoning to prop his decisions and policies in Parliament, and in front of the cameras. His emerging favourite? The "Goldilocks fallacy."
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Dealing With Trolls In A Donald Trump World

Back when the primaries kicked off, the trolls found a common hero in Trump. Someone on the outside the norm of the establishment, someone not taken seriously. Someone himself a master at getting reactions from making a single statement. I mean, that's the whole purpose of trolling, isn't it? Get people defensive and engage them to react with real emotions and sincerity.
CP

Every day, I Discover a New Reason to Vote out Harper

I am a reluctant activist. I don't like rocking the boat. But when our federal election was called in August, it occurred to me that the entries in my blog might be worth sharing. So I'm posting 78 of them to a Facebook page, 78 Days, 78 Reasons. It's my hope they'll help reasonable Canadians, particularly young people and small c-conservatives, see that we deserve better.
ASSOCIATED PRESS

Don't Believe Everything You Read About Flu Deaths

The CDC's decision to play up flu deaths dates back a decade, when it realized the public wasn't following its advice on the flu vaccine. During the 2003 flu season "the manufacturers were telling us that they weren't receiving a lot of orders for vaccine,"Dr. Glen Nowak, associate director for communications at CDC's National Immunization Program, told National Public Radio.
CP

Watching the Watchdog: Politicians Refusing to Communicate

What we have here is a refusal to communicate. We have a prime minister who refuses to explain why three of his Conservative senators have been forced to resign from his party. When it comes to codes of silence, His Worship the oafish mayor of Toronto, Rob Ford, has learned a lot from the nation's chief magistrate.