Quebec Sovereignty

CP

Anyone But Harper Means Trouble for the Bloc

In a strange way sovereignists share in the shame over Harper's Canada and want to react against it. As a result, they have decided to support the NDP instead of the Bloc, if the latest polls are any indication. And there's the rub, because that support seems completely illogical, and provides federalists with a potential political trap they will quickly spring against sovereignists.If the sovereignist vote for the NDP translates into a loss for Gilles Duceppe and the Bloc Québécois, we'll end up with only federalist parties and MPs in Ottawa.
CP

Key FLQ Member Dies

Francis Simard, one of four members of the Front de libération du Québec charged with the murder of a Quebec cabinet minister during the 1970 October Crisis, has died, his daughter confirmed to CBC....
CP

Marois Regrets Talking Referendum

With only two days left before the election, Parti Québécois leader Pauline Marois is looking back on her campaign and says if she could do it again, she would speak less about the possibility of a re...

A Governing PQ Would Hold A Referendum

Quebec’s minister responsible for Montreal, Jean-François Lisée, says that if the Parti Québécois were to get a majority government in the next provincial election, it opens the door to a future refer...
CP

DISUNITY

OTTAWA - The NDP's proposed "unity bill" has sparked some disunity in the party's own ranks.One of the most prominent NDP stalwarts, former Saskatchewan premier Roy Romanow, says he disagrees with the...
PC

Quebec's Signature on the Constitution Is Symbolic But Ideal

The Constitution of 1982 is the fundamental law of the land everywhere in Canada, including Quebec, notwithstanding the regrettable fact that the then sovereigntist premier of Quebec, René Lévesque, refused to sign the final document. However, although not legally necessary, it is nevertheless desirable that the National Assembly of Quebec formally endorse the 1982 constitutional changes.
CP

Canada and Quebec: Don't Stay Together For the Kids

If Pauline Marois' government decides it wants to lead Quebec out of Canada, to my mind she's simply following the logical path that has been laid down (intentionally or not) by our Federal leaders over the past 145 years. If it turns out Quebec wants a divorce we should grant it and move on. It seems evident there wasn't much of a family to begin with, and we don't seem to want to start building one now.