Racism Canada

This Canadian Stood Up to Racism Before Rosa Parks

Rachel Décoste | Posted 09.10.2014 | Canada Impact
Rachel Décoste

In the social context of Canada before the Quiet Revolution (1950s), before Viola Desmond's act of defiance (1946), before Rosa Parks triggered the United States' Civil Rights Movement (1955), Fred Christie stood up to institutional discrimination. A decade before the Universal Declaration of Human Rights (1947), Fred Christie exhibited unimaginable courage and perseverance in asserting his civil rights. Though the judicial process did not deliver the desired result, Fred Christie remains a key instigator in Canada's journey towards the establishment of universal rights.

Setting the Record Straight on Temporary Foreign Workers

Dan Kelly | Posted 07.09.2014 | Canada Business
Dan Kelly

It seems the recent firestorm around the Temporary Foreign Worker program has brought out the very best, as well as the very worst, in Canadians. The program has some flaws. But we all need to take a deep breath and avoid the temptation to convict an employer based on a media story.

Discrimination and Denial: The Racial Skeletons in Canada's Closet

Craig and Marc Kielburger | Posted 05.28.2014 | Canada Impact
Craig and Marc Kielburger

Canada has made tentative steps in acknowledging racism in our past, like aboriginal residential schools and the Chinese head tax. But there is a tendency to view these as isolated events of history. With our national rhetoric of a tolerant and multicultural society, many Canadians bristle at the suggestion that racial discrimination was and is a force in Canada.

Canada's First Racial Discrimination Trial

Rachel Décoste | Posted 04.22.2013 | Canada
Rachel Décoste

It is oft-implied that the United States had segregation while Canada was above this racial retardment. Hollywood movies dramatize the plight of Afric...

The $100 (Bill) Question: Is Canada's Multiculturalism a Farce?

Rachel Décoste | Posted 10.17.2012 | Canada Politics
Rachel Décoste

The xenophobia from the Quebec election spilled over to the rest of Canada today when it was revealed that the Bank of Canada, our country's central bank, chose to carve out all hints of diversity from its $100 bank note after heeding to discriminatory judgements from focus groups. As Canadians born with names a rural Quebec mayor cannot pronounce and with facial features unfit for a Canadian bank note, it is high time Canada acknowledge its long legacy of divisiveness and address its ugly remnants in order to move forward to the pluralistic vision of our beloved country we have yet to fully achieve.

Hate Crimes In Canada Down

CP | The Canadian Press | Posted 06.12.2012 | Canada

OTTAWA - The number and rate of police-reported hate crimes based on race or religion declined sharply in 2010, but incidents involving sexual orienta...

One Kind of Racism is Not Like the Other

Yoni Goldstein | Posted 05.22.2012 | Canada
Yoni Goldstein

Faint racist thought in and of itself isn't really a problem and can't really be classified as such if more than half of us are doing it. The real problem is that 52 per cent of Canadians conceded their tame racism out loud.