Richard Florida

New Brunswick: Avoiding Defeatism in Economic Development

There seems to be a prevalent trend in media and political commentary about New Brunswick; that our province is falling behind, in decline. There are no doubt serious challenges facing New Brunswick, including recent unemployment numbers that are the highest in the country, and a recent increase in outmigration rates.However, it is not all bad news.

Saving Capitalism from Itself

This piece originally appeared in the Toronto Star. You don't have to be a Marxist to wonder if capitalism has run its course. Though the stock market is soaring the economic recovery is jobless, mill...
CP

Casinos Ruin Cities

Toronto's business leaders like to think that they are helping to build a great global city, but casino building is city-ruining of the highest order. A downtown casino will tear holes in Toronto's urban fabric, create more costs than benefits, and send the message that Toronto is on the wrong track.
Alamy

What Canadian Cities Can Learn From Fredericton

Good urban planning is important to preserving Fredericton's quality of life advantages that make it a desirable place to live and work. This includes promoting walkable streets, unique architecture that enhances the character of the city, and curbing generic box-store style sprawl.
Flickr: scazon

Why You Should Choose New Brunswick

Our province offers the advantage of city and town centres in close proximity to forests and rural areas. Smaller cities and municipalities can offer a strong sense of community as well as shorter commute times and a less hectic pace of life than in centres like Toronto and Montreal -- these can be attractions to potential migrants and immigrants seeking an alternative to the big-city lifestyle.

Canada's Most Creative Cities

In this exclusive excerpt for HuffPost from Richard Florida's new book, the author reveals that scientists and engineers, architects and designers, artists and entertainers and the growing ranks of professional knowledge workers -- what he labels as The Creative Class" -- now number more than five million in Canada, or roughly 30 per cent of the workforce. So where do they live?