Romeo Dallaire

pygment_shots/Flickr

Facing The Horror Of Child Soldiers

Some 31,000 women are currently pregnant inside the Islamic State. These children born out of conflict will form the future ranks of the group. School curriculum is being altered and reshaped to support extremism and strict adherence to the Islamic State's view of religion and philosophy. Children are desensitized to violence and trained for combat from an early age. This presents a complex, yet vitally important, challenge for any nations engaged with the Islamic State.
CP

How Dallaire Relived Rwanda in Canada

In ironic fashion, Romeo Dallaire was reliving the events of Rwanda, only on a less costly human scale. Sent to the Senate to bring intellectual rigor and disciplined experience, he was increasingly abandoned by a government that delighted more in waging domestic war in political ridings than in enhancing Canada's human rights and diplomatic record on the world's stage. He called for resources; they didn't arrive. He sought meetings with political elites; they didn't transpire. And when he ultimately called the government to account for its abandonment of Canada's diplomatic expertise in the world, he was ultimately abandoned and isolated
CP

The Senate Loses One of Its Best as Romeo Dallaire Departs

For reasons which are amply documented and well-known, as a Senator Romeo Dallaire committed himself to the most serious of issues: prevention of genocide, Post-traumatic stress disorder (or PTSD), child soldiers, conflict resolution and investigation into crimes against humanity. He is, in other words, a champion of causes that are for most politicians quagmires to be circumnavigated. The departure of Romeo Dallaire means that there will be one less serious, hard-working and principled member in the Upper Chamber.
CP

Dallaire Resigns

OTTAWA — Liberal Sen. Romeo Dallaire, a career soldier best known in Canada as former commander of the UN's ill-fated peacekeeping mission in Rwanda, is resigning _ not retiring, he insists _ from the...
CP

Dallaire Retiring From Senate

Liberal Senator Romeo Dallaire says he's retiring from the Senate. CBC News Network's Evan Solomon reports Dallaire is retiring because of a combination of issues: His desire to spend more time on pos...

Remembering Rwanda's Pain and the World's Shame

In the annals of human evil, Rwanda's genocide takes a special place. With a kill rate of about six people a minute for more than three months, it's likely one of the fastest mass slaughters of humans in history. Most were hacked to death by machete, partly because the perpetrators found it cheaper than using bullets.
Getty

Romeo Dallaire: A Giant After Mandela

Snapshots of Nelson Mandela continue to swell the collective, global memory as deeply personal tributes pour onto the web. In the Canadian psyche too, is the imprint of a giant. It happens to be another man who made news this month: Roméo Dallaire, the retired Lieutenant-General who witnessed genocide in Rwanda.
Getty

Romeo Dallaire Has Turned His Depression into Purpose

When I read that Romeo Dallaire had been in a car accident on Parliament Hill just outside of East Block, I wondered if it was due to fatigue. I have never known him to be other than fully occupied and frequently exhausted in the course of his heavy schedule. Romeo has a lot more than just memories to fight. As he explained this week, he fights depression and remains medicated for PTSD. But he has turned his pain into a purpose, and in so doing he can get up every day.
HuffPost

The Week in Review: Why Is a Canadian Hero on the Speakers' List for an "Anti-Semitic Conference"?

Senator Romeo Dallaire is currently listed as a speaker at a conference being held by an organization that the Southern Poverty Law Center calls "perhaps the single largest group of hard-core anti-Semites in North America." Other speakers at this event will include the president of the John Birch Society and a former professor who is slated "to explain satan's role in current human history." You don't have to agree with every position a group takes before agreeing to talk to them. But when a sitting senator is given high billing as a speaker to a divisive fringe group that was apparently too far right for William F. Buckley, there's reason to get riled up.

Roméo Dallaire's Fight to Make Child Soldiers an Oxymoron

Fight Like Soldiers, Die Like Children humanizes the global struggle to end the use of children in armed conflict. Pushing aside the morass of international norms and NGO reports -- important and useful as they are -- Dallaire asks a simple yet harrowing question: how is it that we can go "apeshit" -- to use his word -- when our own children's rights are violated, but passively accept the reality of child soldiers throughout the world?

Roméo Dallaire Is Fighting to Get Children off the Battlefield

More than 250,000 children under 18 are involved in at least 17 conflicts around the world today. In 2008 Romeo Dallaire, now a Canadian Senator, founded the Child Soldiers Initiative to raise awareness, pressure world governments to take action, and train police and military forces from around the world to protect children and prevent them from being recruited as soldiers.