Sandwich Generation

Philippe Regard via Getty Images

A Survivor's Guide To The Sandwich Generation

According to Statistics Canada, the "sandwich generation" now includes more than two million Canadians -- or 28 per cent of all caregivers in Canada -- with the majority being women between 35 and 44 years old. This number is only expected to rise as Canada's population ages and the older generation is no longer capable of caring for themselves. That leaves us with a generation stuck with caring for their late-leaving adult children and their ailing parents at the same time. How do they cope?
Getty

Are You Part of the 'Sandwich Generation'?

Having both parents at work is the norm, which means that childcare obligations must be balanced, often precariously, with workplace duties. At the same time, our population is aging and people often end up having to look after their elderly parents. Effectively, those in the workforce are stuck in the middle, caring for the generations before and after them -- the "Sandwich Generation".
Shutterstock

Living in a Retirement Home: Is it a Positive Thing?

When is it time for you parents to move to a retirement home? The decision to move from the home you've lived in for years to a new community where you may not know anyone is certainly difficult. The important thing is to feel that you are making progress and that helping your parents transition to a retirement community is a positive thing. It is.
Shutterstock

University and the Cast-Off Parent

Our kids have been with us for so long, day and night, and we miss them. They may have been the focus of our lives. The irony is, we try very hard to be good parents and to raise smart, savvy, caring kids, but if we do, we'll raise them to be independent.