Saving For Retirement

Anthony Rosenberg

Save Early, Save Often

The world is less linear than ever before. Whether you're collecting your first paycheque or gearing up for the golden years of retirement, a solid financial plan can help guide you towards a brighter life, regardless of what path you choose to take. Here are a few handy hints to help plan for some of life's big moments.
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Saving For Retirement? Do This First

It seems obvious: save as much money as early as you can. You'll benefit from compound interest and you'll build a savings habit that will serve you well when your pay goes up. But just because it's o...
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Do You Really Need An RRSP?

The younger generation does not have the same kind of job security and employers are hiring more people on contract. Some people will choose to start their own businesses instead of being employees. Workplace pension plans are almost extinct. Now it would seem that saving for your retirement is up to you.
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Why Investing is a lot Like Weight Loss

After losing 20 pounds, I can tell you that successful investing looks a lot like successful weight loss. Obvious likenesses between the two aside -- expensive products, conflicting "expert" advice, confusing strategies -- there are three similarities that will see you through to the investing finish line.
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Will the Government Eliminate Capital Gains Tax?

By doubling the maximum contribution for a Tax-Free Savings Account (TFSA), which would therefore jump to $11,000 a year according to rumours surrounding next Tuesday's budget, the federal government is doing more than just encourage saving; it's taking a step toward the de facto elimination of the capital gains tax on financial investments for the great majority of Canadians.
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Do You Know Where Your Money Really Goes?

The reality is most of us have no idea where our money goes, and because of this it feels like there is never enough. But the irony is taking control of our personal finances and allocating only one hour a week to it, has the power to make us feel more in control and confident about our personal financial situation and future.
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My Mother's Own "Cheap Week"

When I read my daughter's article about her "Cheap Week" it warmed my heart that she is as cheap as I was. It brought back memories of my own youthful financial desperation. It's good to know that she's inherited the family cheap streak. I, too, had to be cheap, so why did I get concerned when I realized my daughter was tippy toeing around the poverty line?
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How to Find the Perfect Financial Advisor for You

Finding "the right one" these days can be very complicated, and by the one I mean the right financial advisor! Searching for an advisor that is the perfect match takes time, effort and plenty of research. Finding the right financial advisor is not necessarily a simple task but it can be straightforward if you follow some basic guidelines.
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Top 10 Dumb Things People Say About Pensions

Canadians are certainly living longer, healthier lives but not everyone. Twenty four percent of seniors have multiple chronic conditions and take on average 5 different prescription meds. Older workers who lost their jobs in the late 1990s had three times as much difficulty getting new ones as their younger counterparts and they either got jobs within the first two years or not at all.

Save Your Retirement By Saving For Your Child's Education

There are many different ways to invest the money inside your RESP. As a parent, my rule was simple: I did not want to take any significant risks with the money I was saving for my children's learning. I was satisfied with receiving the 20 per cent government grant, and a modest return on my money. For me, it was more important that the money be there when I needed it.
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Have You Met Your RRSP?

Each year you are required to take out a portion of your savings from your RRIF, which is subject to tax, but there's no limit on how much you can withdraw. In addition you can name your spouse as a beneficiary, so RRIF assets can be transferred to your spouses' RRIF or RRSP on your death. You can't keep your savings in an RRSP forever.