SENIORS

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The Upsides To Growing Old

There is no shortage of jokes about old age and what old people can get away with, like, you can eat dinner whenever you want or make remarks younger folks would get arrested for. But seriously, there are aspects of aging that really can make a difference in how we relate to what is still in store for us.
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How Often Do You Think About Nutrition?

Eating less may not be a problem if a person is reducing their level of physical activity. However, it is vital the diet is sufficient enough in calories and nutrients to maintain healthy organs, muscles, and bones. Skipping a meal every so often is not an issue for your body but when it becomes a regular occurrence it can lead to malnutrition and serious health problems.
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What Seniors In Love Really Look Like

With Valentine's Day just around the corner, Canadians are preparing to be inundated with feel-good stories of love and romance. From the excitement of puppy love to heartwarming tales of soulmates finding each other despite the odds, it seems that none of us are immune to the effects of Cupid's arrow. Despite all this, a common myth still pervades that love, romance and the need for companionship fade over time, and that as we grow older, we become less interested in keeping love alive.
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Should Our Health Care System Be Ageist?

The complexity of ageing arises because, as we age, we are more likely to have more than one illness and to take more than one medication. And as we age, the illnesses that we have are more likely to restrict how we live -- not just outright disability, but in our moving more slowly, or taking care in where we walk, or what we wear or where we go.
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Canada Needs A Strategy To Improve Senior Drug Safety

Many drugs prescribed to seniors have either not been adequately studied for this age group or have not been formally approved for the conditions they are being prescribed to treat. They are sometimes prescribed without any evidence they are safe and effective for them, and in some cases, even when they are known to present a possible risk (antipsychotics prescribed to older patients with dementia, for example).