Single Mothers

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5 Ways To Help A Mom in Need This Mother's Day

We all have stories of moms who've gone to extraordinary lengths to provide for and protect their children. But we all need a little help sometimes, and often, the most courageous thing many of us can do is ask for it. This Mother's Day, World Vision is asking you to consider helping a mother in need. She might be your next-door-neighbor, or a woman on the other side of the world.
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Being A Single Mom Doesn't Mean I'm Alone

I'm a single mom, and I live with my two boys, ages five and seven, all by myself. I've become adept at managing the day-to-day routine alone. In fact, the idea of asking for help at this point is almost embarrassing. To me, relying on someone, asking for help, means I'm weak and needy.
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4 Ways Youth Should Not Spend A Night Away From Home

It can take less than 10 seconds for a youth to become homeless. In York Region, homeless youth, more often than not, do not fit the stereotypical profile. Unlike urban centres, these young people are often homeless not just due to poverty. They stem from middle-class families and end up on the street for a variety of reasons.
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Black Children Need Better Parents, Not Schools

The Toronto Star and other publications have touted the success of Ontario's Africentric school system. The problem is, one would expect higher test scores and improved behaviour from students who attend such a school, as the program will self-select parents who care more about their children and are engaged in their education. The fact is, as confirmed in countless studies, that the collapse of the black family within a segment of the black community is the primary reason so many of our children fall through the cracks of society, to be broken against the hard, unbending steel of racism, prejudice, failure and depression. No amount of "specialty schools" can change that.
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What Happens When Mom Earns More

When the Pew Research Center released their report on Breadwinner Moms, the results of their survey were nothing short of controversial: In 40 per cent of households in the United States with children under 18 years, mothers were the ones who were bringing in the money -- either as the sole or primary breadwinner for the family.