Species At Risk Act

Dianne Bersea

Get To Know Your Species At Risk

That list of wildlife in danger has almost doubled since I started working at the Nature Conservancy of Canada (NCC) in 2002. Today, there are 748 species that have been assessed as at risk in Canada by COSEWIC. Part of this steep increase has resulted from more species being assessed.
supersum/Flickr

Wild Bees Need Our Protection Now

Buzzing along, providing essential pollination services for both wild plants and cultivated crops, wild bees fulfill many important functions necessary to ensuring we have healthy ecosystems and flourishing agricultural economies. Unfortunately in recent years, we have seen a steep decline in the wild bee populations we depend on so much.
YouTube

Trouble Could Be Brewing for B.C.'s Endangered Killer Whales

Two years ago, Ecojustice and our clients celebrated a landmark win for protection of B.C.'s iconic killer whales under the Species at Risk Act. And while there have been some recent signs that these populations may be on the long road to recovery, proposed projects like the Kinder Morgan Trans Mountain pipeline expansion and now the Roberts Bank Terminal 2 expansion pose new threats to their survival.
E R DEGGINGER via Getty Images

Is Canada Protecting At-Risk Species or Risky Industries?

The St. Lawrence Estuary beluga whale population is listed as threatened and protected under the Species at Risk Act, and has been officially protected by the Canadian Fisheries Act since 1979. We naturally run into concern when those trusted to protect these species are scrubbing their content to make it more friendly for oil interests who are rummaging around for an alternate route to the ocean.
ASSOCIATED PRESS

Wildlife Win in Court, But Lose on the Ground

Of 345 species at risk in Canada, more than 160 have waited far too long for recovery strategies. Thanks to a recent federal court decision, four luckier ones are finally getting overdue plans detailing steps needed to save and protect them. But court victories are just a start. It will take political will to ensure species and their habitats get the protection they need.

Bill C-38: The Law That Will Break Nature's Back?

Canada's environmental laws are under attack by both the federal and Ontario governments. In Ottawa, the government introduced Bill C-38 to implement far-reaching measures announced in its budget. The 420-page Bill C-38 will gut a raft of federal laws passed over the years to ensure that our air, water, and most vulnerable wildlife populations are protected.
AP

Going to Bat for Our Flying Furry Friends

Many of the 1,200 known species of bats are in trouble. And we humans deserve much of the blame. A bat can eat more than 1,000 insects in an hour, and without the services of bats, the agave plant, from which we get tequila, might not survive. So, if you like tequila but not mosquito bites, you should view bats as your friends.
Flickr/tinken

Woodland Caribou Are at a Crossroads

One endangered herd in Alberta's tar sands region is at great risk of disappearing. Clear-cutting and no-holds-barred oil and gas exploration and development have affected more than 60 per cent of the habitat of the Red Earth caribou herd, leaving little undisturbed forest where it can feed, breed, and roam.