Species at Risk

It's a Slippery Slope for Canadian Species at Risk

Brett Favaro | Posted 11.16.2014 | Canada Impact
Brett Favaro

We have found that 86 per cent of species considered to be at risk of extinction in Canada are either deteriorating or failing to recover. Despite the fact that many of these species should be receiving protection, the government has largely failed to identify the critical habitat necessary for the species to recover, and as a result this habitat may be going unprotected. This is bad news for biodiversity.

Down-Listing Jeopardizes Humpback Whales

Chris Genovali | Posted 06.24.2014 | Canada British Columbia
Chris Genovali

Most scientists would agree that humpbacks are "recovering," but few would agree they are "recovered." It is this issue that is causing the disagreement over whether the decision to down-list the B.C. population was premature, and not based on enough evidence of recovery within B.C.

Removing Humpback From Threatened List A GOOD Thing: Scientists

The Huffington Post B.C. | Posted 04.23.2014 | Canada British Columbia

Biologists are defending the science behind the Canadian government's recent decision to downgrade North Pacific humpback whales from the "threatened"...

Humpback Whale REMOVED From 'Threatened' List

The Huffington Post B.C. | Posted 04.23.2014 | Canada British Columbia

The North Pacific humpback whale is no longer protected as a "threatened" species after the Canadian government quietly downgraded its classification ...

Wildlife Win in Court, But Lose on the Ground

David Suzuki | Posted 05.05.2014 | Canada
David Suzuki

Of 345 species at risk in Canada, more than 160 have waited far too long for recovery strategies. Thanks to a recent federal court decision, four luckier ones are finally getting overdue plans detailing steps needed to save and protect them. But court victories are just a start. It will take political will to ensure species and their habitats get the protection they need.

Does it Matter if a Non-Descript Plant Goes Extinct? The Jenga theory of biodiversity

The Nature Conservancy of Canada | Posted 04.15.2014 | Canada
The Nature Conservancy of Canada

Recently, I was interviewed about the discovery of a little flowering plant -- one of the rarest in my home province and a federally listed species at...

'Huge Backlog' Affecting Endangered Species?

CP | Dene Moore, The Canadian Press | Posted 03.11.2014 | Canada British Columbia

VANCOUVER - The federal ministers responsible for protecting endangered species took action on four critically threatened species because they were fa...

Why Did It Take SO LONG To Save Humpbacks?

CP | Dene Moore, The Canadian Press | Posted 03.10.2014 | Canada British Columbia

VANCOUVER - The federal government has violated Canadian law by failing to protect endangered species, a coalition of environmental groups told a Fede...

December Is a Time to Review the Status of Canada's Endangered Species

The Nature Conservancy of Canada | Posted 02.18.2014 | Canada Impact
The Nature Conservancy of Canada

For those of us who are interested in the field of conservation biology, this time of year prompts us to be more thoughtful about lists of a different kind: the Committee on the Status of Endangered Wildlife in Canada ceremoniously completes a review of (in overly simplified terms) Canada's endangered species list at the end of each year.

Who's Letting One of B.C.'s Most Imperilled Ecosystems Die?

Peter Arcese | Posted 11.05.2013 | Canada British Columbia
Peter Arcese

The Coastal Douglas Fir Zone (CDF) extends throughout the Lower Mainland's Georgia Basin and is recognized by conservation biologists as one of the most biologically unique and lush landscapes in Western Canada. Despite its degradation, the area has yet to see a sustained, coordinated effort by government, non-profits and private land owners to ensure of one of our most treasured native landscapes is conserved for future generations.

Ontario's Wildlife Needs Continued Protection

David Suzuki | Posted 07.22.2013 | Canada
David Suzuki

The protection of at-risk species, once maintained so well by our government, has taken a backseat to business development. Now when habitat needs to be protected to ensure the survival of a species, government and industry often balk and backpedal. This signals a failure to understand that we depend on nature for our well-being and survival.

Sonar and Whales Are a Deadly Mix

David Suzuki | Posted 04.29.2013 | Canada
David Suzuki

Human-caused noise pollution harms whales, leading to death, stranding, temporary and permanent hearing loss and hemorrhaging around the brain, ears and other tissues. Sonar used in naval training is a major cause of these debilitating and often deadly injuries to whales and other aquatic animals. With their sensitive hearing, marine mammals are particularly vulnerable.

B.C. Steps Up To Protect Caribou

CP | The Canadian Press | Posted 01.08.2013 | Canada British Columbia

VICTORIA - The B.C. government is promising to protect 90 per cent of the winter habitat for the northern Caribou, which are considered threatened und...