Stroke

alex-mit via Getty Images

How Microbes Could Give You a Heart Attack

Twenty years ago, heart disease was the number one killer of Canadians. That number has dropped over the years thanks in part to research examining the causes of heart attacks and recommendations for better preventative behaviours. Despite this drop, there is still much to be learned about how heart attacks happen. One of the most studied causes is the atherosclerotic lesion, better known as plaque. This accumulation of cells, fats, minerals, and other organic material tend to accumulate in the arteries as we age. If buildup happens to occur in the coronary artery, cardiac arrest may inevitably happen.
Alamy

How to Love Your Heart this February

February is Heart Month in Canada. For those of you who pledge to lose weight and get in better shape this year, I encourage you to stay true to your resolution -- make sustainable changes in your lives so you can achieve the goals you know you should.
Alamy

Alzheimer's: Goodbye, My Love

What Nancy Reagan called the long goodbye has, for me, come to an end. My beloved husband has died, peacefully, in his own home, surrounded by people who loved him. It was indeed, a long goodbye. Seven years spent with Alzheimer's. And a final year, playing hide and seek with death.
Alamy

Alzheimers: Caregiving, Seven Years Later

This month, my husband and I enter the seventh year of living with Alzheimer's (AD). The past seven years have been years of learning, of facing the inevitability of age, and what aging means, of stretching myself to accept new responsibilities. I am no longer the only caregiver.

Can Nature Keep Medical Costs Down?

It's easier, more effective, and cheaper to let healthy bodies fight off disease and infections than to weaken those defence mechanisms and then compensate for them medically. If we want a stable health system, we must put more resources into reducing pollution and environmental degradation and creating a way of life that keeps bodies and minds happy and in good health.