Syria War

Unicef

Children Suffer As Taps Run Dry In Syria's Capital

An estimated 5.5 million people, including two million children, have been cut off from running water for over three weeks in Damascus and its surroundings, the longest cut Syria's capital has seen. Intense fighting damaged the water infrastructure for the two main drinking water sources for Damascus.
UNICEF

Meet 5 Children Caught In The Crossfires Of War

Often traumatized by the conflicts and violence they are fleeing, they face further dangers along the way, including the risk of drowning on sea crossings, malnourishment and dehydration, trafficking, kidnapping, and rape. In countries they travel through and at their destinations, they often face xenophobia and discrimination.

Seeing Syria's Horrors: A Message for Finance Ministers

In the coming weeks, we can hope that finance ministers from some of the world's most developed countries take heed and remember the real victims of Syria's war: its people. As they attend the IMF-World Bank to talk about their budgets, they must not forget their financial commitments to Syria. Political leaders, too, must look at their collective influence and ability to address a conflict that has limped from one tragedy to the next.
Getty

He's Getting Stronger

PARIS - Violent extremists who seek to overthrow Syrian President Bashar Assad may instead have hurt negotiations to replace him.That's frustrating Western diplomats who continue to push for Assad's o...
AP

Syrian Children Were Always "Defenceless"

Earlier this week, U.S. Vice President Joe Biden decried the use of chemical weapons on "defenceless men, women and children" in Syria. As someone who works for an international aid and development agency looking out for children, something is deadly certain to me: Those children have been defenceless ever since the war in Syria began.

GROOCH: Feeding Time In Syria (CARTOON)

In the late weeks of August 2012 President Obama, played up the concern of chemical weapon movement in Syria, talking about how that could determine U.S. involvement. Explaining that would be the crossing of a "RED LINE". I remember the last time a president talked about a foreign country and the movement of it's arrsenal AKA: weapons of mass destruction.
File/Getty

How Could the International Community Let This Happen?

In February 2012, amidst the then unfolding horror in Syria, British journalist Marie Colvin summed it up in one final poignant and painful dispatch before she herself was murdered in the assault on Homs: "In Baba Amr. Sickening. Cannot understand how the world can stand by... Feeling helpless... No one here can understand how the international community can let this happen."