Teenagers

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I Used To Live In A Parkdale Rooming House

I lived in a rooming house in Parkdale when I was 15 years old. In remembering all this, I realize I was one of those 'vulnerable people' we see cited in discussions about housing and the effects of gentrification. I don't know what particular struggles the other tenants were facing, because I was too caught up in my own teenage angst and awkwardness to ask, but what we had in common was that we were alone. A rooming house was a landing place for me, so why are we treating it like a slur?
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What It's Like To Be A Teenager Today

Too short, too tall, flat, too skinny, too fat, too veiny, too short hair, way too long hair, too many piercings, boobs that are too big, too many pimples, too many freckles, too hairy, bad teeth, too much makeup, caked, ugly clothes, out of shape, bad at sports, fag. Here is just a taste of some of the things teens say to put their peers down.
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How To Inadvertently Turn Your Kid Into A Sociopath

Parents do their kids no favours when they're in denial of their child's capacity for behaving badly. Parents need to stop idealizing their children. They need to see that even their precious darlings are capable of behaving badly, and that it's their job to guide these children onto the right path in life. If parents remain this state of denial, their children are deprived of of this guidance.
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Teens And Teeth Whitening: What You Should Know

Teenagers deal with all sorts of pressures and self esteems issues, and their appearance are high on that list; so, what do you do when they say their smile isn't as bright and white as they want it to be? As parents, we strive to help our kids feel better about themselves; but before you buy those whitening strips or make that teeth whitening appointment, you should sink your teeth into the facts, first.
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Learning To Communicate With Your Teen

Teens need to feel connected to their parents if they're going to open up to them, but it's harder these days for teens to connect. Social media makes it easier to be isolated and disconnected from parents and peers, as teens can opt to plug in to their technology and stay plugged in, rather than build real-life relationships.