The Biggest Loser

'The Biggest Loser' Winner Gains 20 Pounds After Finale

The Huffington Post Canada | Posted 04.04.2014 | Canada Living

After shocking the world with her 155-pound weight loss on the last season of 'The Biggest Loser," winner Rachel Frederickson has gained 20 pounds sin...

Think About Your Relationship With Your Body, Not How It Looks Today

Kathleen Trotter | Posted 04.28.2014 | Canada Living
Kathleen Trotter

I was an unhealthy teenager. I hated my body, and I didn't think that much of the rest of me either. I always felt awkward, so I gorged on things like ultra-cheesy pasta to escape life. I have gradually built self-confidence and slowly replaced most of my bad habits with better ones, but the old me, or at least the memory of the old me, still exists and will always exist.

The Biggest Loser Celebrates the Skinniest Bodies, Not the Healthiest

Marci Warhaft-Nadler | Posted 04.07.2014 | Canada Living
Marci Warhaft-Nadler

Having experienced life with an eating disorder myself, I fear what lies ahead for Rachel. Right now her entire self-worth is being based on how she looks and how much weight she lost. What's going to happen if her body fights back and puts on a few pounds? How will she feel about herself then?

The Week in Review: Everything I Need to Know About Weight Loss I Learned From a Cat

Marni Soupcoff | Posted 03.21.2013 | Canada
Marni Soupcoff

This week, with the New Year in full swing, attention focused on that familiar January preoccupation: losing weight. Shedding excess pounds can certainly be healthy. The trouble is, in our zeal for fighting obesity, we sometimes end up taking a punitive stand that does more to marginalize and harm people who are overweight than it does to actually help them get healthier. How about taking our cues from Tiny, the formerly obese New Brunswick cat, and keeping the weight loss theme focused on small consistent steps that lead to big results?

The Real Biggest Losers? The Show's Audience

Yoni Freedhoff M.D. | Posted 03.16.2013 | Canada Living
Yoni Freedhoff M.D.

While I personally find The Biggest Loser to be an emotionally and physically abusive, misinformative, horror show, it's clearly beloved and trusted by many. And while my personal opinions shouldn't concern you, the peer-reviewed medical literature should. Along with being taught that obesity is treatable by means of incredible amounts of vomit-inducing exercise, severe dietary restriction, and never-ending servings of guilt and shame, the medical literature suggests viewers will also be taught that failure is an obese child's personal choice.

The Biggest Loser Doesn't Help Others Lose Weight, Study Finds

The Huffington Post Canada | Posted 10.28.2012 | Canada Living

It may be inspiring to watch contestants shed upwards of 100 pounds on TV's "The Biggest Loser," but it's not doing anything for your own weight loss ...