Traffic

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Green Light Road Tolls To Get Toronto Moving Again

Road tolls provide more than just a funding tool to build transit. Road pricing also reduces congestion. It creates incentives to carpool or take transit. Pricing is essential to allocating scarce road resources efficiently and affordably. Instead of being honest with people about the need for funding solutions, however, politicians at Queen's Park have poured cold water on Toronto's plan to pay for transit.
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Fewer Kids Walk Or Bike To School -- And That Hurts Everyone

More than twice as many kids are driven to school these days compared to 25 years ago, and that's having an impact on everyone. In a study released April 5 by Metrolinx, the Greater Toronto and Hamilton Area's transportation planning agency, researchers found a decline among youth in the use of physically active modes of transportation to commute to school over a 25-year period. And this has huge implications for the future of Toronto.
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6 Bike Safety Tips for Fall and Winter

Rainy days, sunny days, I will ride in pretty much any weather (except maybe when it's icy). I always feel better after riding my bike. As I pedal down the road, my mind and heart are open, and I am able to be creative and think of some of my best ideas. To find out the latest tips on how to keep safe and cycle in the fall, I spoke with Jim Adams, MEC Toronto Cycling Staff.
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6 Road Safety Changes That Could Save Lives

In Toronto on Monday, councillors ordered a blanket reduction in speed limits from 40 to 30 km/h on local roads in the old cities of Toronto and East York. While this approach may make them feel better, it won't do much to improve road safety or reduce congestion. But, here's six ideas that might. If every Ontario driver had similar training, and we adopted these simple rule changes, our roads would be the safest in North America.
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Toronto's Pan Am Transit Plans Divide the City

The GO Transit network has sufficient capacity in the non-peak direction of travel during peak periods, and in both directions during off-peak periods. The government should offer free GO service in off-peak periods and in the non-peak direction during the peak period. The Pan Am Games should bring the City together in a mass celebration of the human spirit. The current plans require people to stay away or at home, which is against the very spirit of the Games. Let's plan better to have fun at the Games.

Understanding Toronto's Transit Future

On an average weekday, 1.6 million people use public transit to navigate Canada's largest city, relying on the Toronto Transit Commission's four subway lines, 11 streetcar routes, and more than 140 bus routes to reach their destinations. Writer Dominic Ali spoke with University of Toronto expert Matti Siemiatycki about where Toronto's transit has been and where it's heading.
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Safer Streets Might Have Prevented This Little Girl's Death

It's a sad day for Toronto as a family will hold funeral for a seven-year-old girl. She was hit by a van near her home. Her death is an unimaginable loss to her family and the community. This loss of life should compel us to think about making our streets safer for all, but especially for pedestrians and bicyclists, who are more vulnerable than others are. The tragedy is raising questions about the harmful impacts of increased traffic on residential streets.
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Why Toronto Needs a Transportation Czar

Anyone who has been down to the Harbourfront recently knows that Queens Quay is under construction. The streetcar tracks are being replaced and Waterfront Toronto is building a new tree-lined promenade that will be spectacular once complete, but creates traffic chaos in the meantime. Although I expected the construction on Queens Quay, nothing prepared me for the trifecta of traffic interruptions that followed. Traffic was already heavy because it was the season home opener for the Argos. That would have been fine, if the rest of the transportation network had been working.
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The Hard Truths About Public Transit in Canada

Some transit experts argue that commute times by high-speed rail transit are shorter. It is true for individual trips, but not for the entire communities. Commuters in transit-dependent communities, with ready access to subways, can take faster transit to their destinations, however shorter duration trips are enjoyed only by those whose trip lengths are shorter. With $29 billion in transport infrastructure spending already earmarked for Ontario, Steven Del Duca and Kathleen Wynne, will receive tons of unsolicited advice. They should, however, base their investment decisions on sound analysis rather than conjecture.
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You Don't Hate Your Commute, You Hate Your Job!

You don't hate your commute, it's your job. A Statistics Canada survey revealed that workers who disliked their jobs were much more likely to hate their commutes than those who liked their jobs. Our hatred of the morning commute may be driven by our unsatisfactory jobs. Extensive surveys of workers in Canada have revealed that our love-hate relationship with daily commutes is much more nuanced than what we had believed it to be.
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Investing in Transit Drives Our Cities to Be Healthier and Happier

There's growing recognition that prioritizing transit is crucial to moving a region forward. Transit-oriented cities have better air quality with lower greenhouse gas emissions and benefit from reduced traffic congestion with shorter commuting times. Evidence even shows people in cities with a range of transportation options, like Vancouver, are less sedentary, get more exercise and are happier and healthier as a result.
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Great Public Transit Makes for a Great City

When it comes to urban sustainability, cities in the U.S. and Canada are employing innovative programs and policies to improve the health and well-being of residents and their local environments. But (with some notable exceptions, such as Vancouver and Calgary) no successful rapid transit infrastructure projects have been built in Canadian cities for decades.

Toronto Traffic is Fine So Long as You Drive Like a Rude Son of a Bitch

Toronto is the fourth most congested area in North America and has a reputation of being a nasty city to drive in. I disagree. I find Toronto alarmingly easy and courteous to drive in -- so long as you are decisive, no nonsense, and not a dawdler. What Toronto motorists can't abide are hesitant slowpokes -- drivers who wait endlessly for openings, who are officiously courteous, who show infuriating patience.
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Bike Lane Infrastructure Pays Dividends

In some European cities, planners are finding that making life more difficult for drivers while providing incentives for people to take transit, walk, or cycle creates numerous benefits, from reducing pollution and smog-related health problems to cutting greenhouse gas emissions and making cities safer and friendlier.