Transportation

Ysbrand Cosijn via Getty Images

It's Time To Ban Car Advertisements Forever

Imagine if all the money used to sell cars were put into promoting cycling and mass transit. To even the playing field, health and environmental agencies could run public education campaigns describing the private automobiles' dangers, pollutants, space consumption, financial burdens, toll on the climate, etc. Malmö Sweden, for instance, ran a "No Ridiculous Car Trips" campaign to reduce journeys of less than five kilometres.
ASSOCIATED PRESS

Will Growing Our Fuels Drive Us To A Cleaner Future?

Biofuels offer several advantages over fossil fuels. Most are less toxic. Crops used to produce them can be grown quickly, so unlike coal, oil and gas that take millions of years to form, they're considered renewable. They can also be grown almost anywhere, reducing the need for infrastructure like pipelines and oil tankers and, in many areas, conflicts around scarcity and political upheaval.
Jupiterimages via Getty Images

Fewer Kids Walk Or Bike To School -- And That Hurts Everyone

More than twice as many kids are driven to school these days compared to 25 years ago, and that's having an impact on everyone. In a study released April 5 by Metrolinx, the Greater Toronto and Hamilton Area's transportation planning agency, researchers found a decline among youth in the use of physically active modes of transportation to commute to school over a 25-year period. And this has huge implications for the future of Toronto.
CP PHOTO/Robert Dall

Why VIA Passenger Rail Is Worth Saving

Across its 4,440-km route, the Canadian provides an essential service to many communities without other public transportation options. It attracts large numbers of international tourists to the Canadian Rockies and communities like Jasper, Alberta. It is a globally-recognized symbol of Canada, and graces our $10 bank notes.
facebook

Canada Must Put a Price on Carbon Emissions

Whenever I meet a Hummer, tension rises in my chest, unkind thoughts develop in my head and my hands tighten and tremble, as if they want to signal something. I've long wondered why that happens, and I think I've finally figured it out. It has something to do with a song, economics and the courteous way to walk your dog.
Radio-Canada

Cities Are Right About Uber, But Wrong About Regulating It

Cities and states around the world are engaged in hand-to-hand combat with mobile tech upstart Uber, a company that is rapidly disrupting the traditional taxi business everywhere. Viewed from an impartial distance, it is pretty clear that, whatever it is, Uber is providing a service traditionally provided by taxis. Complicating matters is that many cities have a chaotic and nonsensical approach to regulating public taxis. Before trying to make sense of where Uber fits into the chaos of its taxi ecosystem, cities such as Toronto would be smart to consider why it regulates the industry in the first place.
Getty Images

Top 7 Reasons to Appreciate Toronto

I was recently in Toronto to interview John Tory, the 65th and current mayor of my adoptive hometown. Thinking about my return to New York, I couldn't help but make comparisons. An age-old saying came to mind. "The grass is always greener on the other side." In my case, was it greener on the other side of the border?
Getty

Politicians Should Leave Transit Planning to the Experts

Unlike the past, when professionals led transport planning in Toronto, transport planning today has become the exclusive purview of poorly informed politicians. To have any chance of addressing gridlock, transit planning has to start with professionals who actually understand real needs and alternative solutions before political choices are made.

Understanding Toronto's Transit Future

On an average weekday, 1.6 million people use public transit to navigate Canada's largest city, relying on the Toronto Transit Commission's four subway lines, 11 streetcar routes, and more than 140 bus routes to reach their destinations. Writer Dominic Ali spoke with University of Toronto expert Matti Siemiatycki about where Toronto's transit has been and where it's heading.
CP

Get High-Speed Rail Policy On Tracks

Clearly the Government of Canada doesn't have an HSR policy, but surely it's time it did the minimum? A basic and badly-needed step would be to lay the policy and political tracks for a future ''blue sky'' proposal regarding high-speed rail.
Getty Images

Why Everyone Wins With Public-Private Partnerships

As governments here in Canada wrestle with the challenge of providing high-quality transportation infrastructure, they should increasingly consider public-private partnerships, or P3s. The record shows P3s are more likely to be built on time and on budget, and they offer greater value for money than conventional infrastructure projects.