War Of 1812

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The Real Story of Canada's "Good Indian"

In the orgy of celebration of the War of 1812, the true legacy of Shawnee warrior Tecumseh has been badly (and perhaps, conveniently) miscast. Far from being ignored, he is now being appropriated by white society and cast as a "good Indian" - brave, heroic, co-operative, and at the ready to do the bidding of his British brethren. He is being placed aside Issac Brock, and the Canadian militia as the great defenders of Canada. His historical role has been reduced to Laura Secord with a feather. A more thorough reading of Tecumseh's life and influence tells a very different story.
Getty

No One Hates on Canada Like a Canadian

Here's the hard truth: no one puts down Canadians with quite as much glee as Canadians themselves. This can range from Canadians who think they are being charmingly self-deprecating to conservatives who hate Canada for not being more American. Plus Canadians in one part of the country love to put down Canadians in other parts (and then use the inevitable backlash as a justification for their initial prejudice).
Alamy

Toronto's New Poet Laureate on the Power of Words

"I'd like to make the post of Poet Laureate as common an idea in Toronto as that of ambulance paramedic, fireman, police officer, or sanitation worker. The Poet Laureate is not as directly present in citizens' lives as perhaps are those whose sirens announce their presence. But I would like to think that the poet -- in general -- is about enhancing citizen's lives as thinking beings."
CP

Government Ads Use And Abuse Taxpayers' Money

Once upon a time, a popular opposition firebrand named Christy Clark stood up in the B.C. Legislature to rip the NDP government for spending tax dollars on shameless, self-promoting advertising. Fast forward 13 years and there was Clark, now B.C. Liberal premier, last week holding court for 90 seconds of taxpayer-funded TV ad time to laud her B.C. Jobs Plan -- even promising that four more weekly installments are on the way.
WikiMedia

Harper, the Museum of Civilization Ain't Broke, so Don't Fix it

Canada's most-visited museum, the Museum of Civilization, is a staple in the National Capital Region. It has garnered sustained interest from locals and foreigners alike with its exhibits showcasing the splendour of cultures and civilizations worldwide. In an abstruse move, the Harper government is announcing today that the beloved museum's mandate is being rebranded to focus solely on domestic history, while the overarching themes of military and monarchy -- sweetheart conservative subjects -- have been touted as guiding principles.
AP

Harper Flubs Foreign Affairs File -- Again

Prime Minister Stephen Harper is making a trip to New York this week, but it isn't to attend a United Nations meeting to which Canada was extended an invitation. The Prime Minister will instead be in the glitzy hotel, where he is due to receive an award from the little-known Appeal of Conscience Foundation, an interfaith partnership of corporate and religious leaders. Between the successive fossil awards for environmental savagery and the unfortunate de-funding of reproductive health in foreign aid, the Harper government continues to slide Canada's international influence down to the gutter.
CP

Canada and Quebec: Don't Stay Together For the Kids

If Pauline Marois' government decides it wants to lead Quebec out of Canada, to my mind she's simply following the logical path that has been laid down (intentionally or not) by our Federal leaders over the past 145 years. If it turns out Quebec wants a divorce we should grant it and move on. It seems evident there wasn't much of a family to begin with, and we don't seem to want to start building one now.

The Week That Was: At Least We Got Something

As of this writing, Canada is 12th, with one gold, five silver and 12 bronze medals. Let us all bow our heads and listen up to what Jerry Seinfeld says: "You win the gold -- you feel good, you win the bronze -- you think, "Well, at least I got something". But when you win that silver it's like, "Congratulations, you almost won. Of all the losers you came in first of that group. You're the number one loser." So at least we have something. A lot of something.
CP

Are the War of 1812 Ads Really Appropriate?

I see the opposition parties have finally taken issue with the government for their heavy promotion of the War of 1812 during Olympic television coverage. The question is not the ad itself; the real issue is whether or not the Olympics are an appropriate venue for this type of saturation advertising? A simple ad highlighting the accomplishments of former Canadian Olympic greats would have been more appropriate.

Cut The 1812 Commercials. Like, Seriously. Now.

Would the federal government please cut it out with their War of 1812 ads? One minute, I'll be watching some riveting event of sportsmanship at the Olympics, and then suddenly CTV cuts to commercial, and I'm treated to an array of cartoonishly noble characters attired in soldierly red coat and womanly bonnet, circa Regency England, with platoons aiming bayonets at the American frenemy, and I'm like: WTF, federal government?
CP

Hey Tories, Celebrating the War of 1812 Should Not be Partisan

This year marks the bicentennial of the outbreak of the War of 1812, and it is right that Canadians recognize and celebrate its significance. To celebrate and commemorate only those parts -- indeed, those parts of parts -- of Canadian history that fit the talking points and policy direction of a particular government is to diminish the true greatness of the Canadian story.

The War of 1812 or Kenney's E-mails? Must Have Been a Slow News Week

It's been 1812-o-rama in the Canadian press this week: Experts agree that the main reason we should care about the War of 1812 is because without that "seminal battle" our beloved country would have suffered some other monstrous fate. And when you're done reading that stuff, check out the myriad articles on an email Minister Jason Kenney wrote wherein he inadvertently told the world what he really thinks of Alberta deputy premier Thomas Lukaszuk. Gripping stuff.

Who Really Won the Battle of 1812?

The battle of 1812 was supposedly lost by the U.S. and therefore won by Great Britain. Apparently, it is true. But rebels in Upper and Lower Canada would continue to challenge the Anglo-Anglican Monarchists by waging a secret uprising in both parts of Canada that would end in 1838. It is remembered as the Caroline Affair.
Smoking Gun Research Agency

Niagara's (Very, Very) Haunted Past

The story of "Sobbing Sophia," a ghost in Niagara-on-the-lake, cannot help but touch your heart. I heard it for the first time when my wife and I decided to take a couple of days and travel there. The town is rich with haunted history, and if you take a look around you might just see something not of this world...
CP

Canada's 'Forgotten Vets' Get Their Due

TORONTO - Scattered plaques and occasional monuments are often the only Canadian reminders of a nearly three-year war fought two centuries ago that saw an empire and an upstart nation struggle for dom...
CP

Tories Plan To Party Like It's 1812

OTTAWA - The public's knowledge of the War of 1812 might be a bit sketchy, but Canadians might not easily forget who's banging the drum for the bicentennial.Parliamentary secretary Pierre Poilievre wa...