World Aids Day

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How Do We Make A Better World For Children Affected By HIV/AIDS?

Since 2011, new infections in children have reduced by a massive 60 per cent -- this drop is responsible for most of the impressive decline in HIV infections globally. So why then is it hard for me to join in the spontaneous applause that tend to break out at events where statements such as "... and her baby was born HIV-free" or "... and my baby is healthy" are made?
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We Must Embrace Inclusion For An AIDS-Free 2030

Few health workers with knowledge of sign language and a lack of written or visual information on HIV in sign language are further barriers for those with hearing impairments. Requiring a sign language interpreter also limits the level of privacy deaf people have when accessing health services. Additionally, much information can get lost in translation. Without comprehensive knowledge of HIV transmission, Lesotho's deaf population remains vulnerable to this virus.
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Canada's Leadership In Ending AIDS Globally Must Start At Home

Speaking at the recent Global Fund replenishment conference in Montreal, Mr. Trudeau touted that "Canada will continue to lead by example, and show the world what we can accomplish when we unite in pursuit of a larger goal." However, this declaration came at a time when HIV rates have been steadily rising across the country, people with HIV being criminalized for non-disclosure and underfunding for HIV organizations.
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A Year After I Disclosed I Have H.I.V.

I was born on May 21st 1993 with H.I.V. In my world this was the scariest thing imaginable. Not the actual virus. I was fortunate enough to learn I could physically live a long relatively healthy life. The stigma has kept me forever afraid. But my disclosure saved my life. That's not the case for everybody and I think it's important we all have a choice. Whatever choice that is, let yourself be happy. Let yourself feel no shame. I am not living with H.I.V, H.I.V is living with me.
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How We Can Get To Zero On AIDS

For the past three years World AIDS Day on December 1st has been themed, "Getting to zero," which means zero new HIV Infections, zero discrimination and zero AIDS-related deaths. Even with these promising new developments however, we cannot underestimate the challenges ahead in responding the AIDS epidemic. More than 71 thousand Canadians were estimated to be living with HIV in 2011 and there were 3,175 new HIV infections. Worldwide, there are a staggering 36 million people living with AIDS.
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The Number One Killer of People With HIV

As advocates, we often like to use analogies to explain the scourge of pandemics like HIV: It's a runaway train with no conductor, a loaded gun in the hands of a madman, a tide that needs to be turned. The problem with analogies though is that they have a way of detracting from the overarching, inevitable truth: People are dying. Real people. By the end of 2012, there were 35.3 million people across the world living with HIV. Even more jarring is the fact that one third of those people also have tuberculosis, and many of them will die before they even know that they have it.
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An HIV/AIDS-Free Generation Is Within Reach

Development of an HIV/AIDS vaccine is still a dream for the future. We have a Canadian strategy that's proven that it can act now to decrease transmission and lower the number of new cases -- a strategy that provides a real opportunity to end the HIV pandemic in our lifetime.

Could the Next Generation Be AIDS-Free?

The theme for World AIDS Day over the next three years will be "Getting to Zero: Zero new infections, Zero discrimination and Zero AIDS related deaths." This message is powerful, however if we are serious about making this a reality, then we need to start purposively tackling the challenges that have hindered our progress so far.
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The HIV Stigma on Aboriginal Reserves

I am part of the HIV support community at Positive Women's Network (PWN) in Vancouver, BC. Many of our members are of Aboriginal descent -- not a surprise, given that Aboriginal people are disproportionately affected by HIV. Stigma shadows discussions about sexual health, mental health and wellness, drug use, and definitely sex itself.
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Does Gender Inequality Cause More Girls to Get HIV?

It is no coincidence that in countries and regions with high HIV/AIDS prevalence, women tend to have a lower position in society. But exactly what are the linkages between how women and girls are valued and their risk for HIV/AIDS? A significant factor is the ability to make choices. Women's lack of power relative to men gives them less bargaining power in negotiating the use of condoms to protect themselves. Poverty and lack of alternative options lead women to use survival strategies, including prostitution and exchange of sex for resources. To improve women's position in society and give them more control over their life choices, the perceived value of women and girls must change.