Young Canadians

KeithBishop

We Are Looking Forward, To Build A Better Public Service

This generation is among the most talented, educated and globally connected ever. While some of the experiences and expectations of these young people are unique to their cohort, they have much in common with Canadian workers of all ages and backgrounds: they are looking for a way to make a difference -- be it at the local, national, or global level. The federal public service must innovate to attract more young people. We need less rigid hierarchies, fewer layers of bureaucracy, more open and transparent decision making, a culture of intelligent risk taking, more opportunity for continuous learning, and greater mobility in and out of government.
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Why Y? A Generation Comes Of Age

Millennials are coming of age, the oldest within the cohort born after 1981 have reached their 30th birthday, a staggering five million of them are adults. Media coverage typically mentions them in terms of its emerging political clout, their impact on the work place or how they are marketed to. Millennials gets the side-show treatment as most day-to-day coverage is aimed at Gen Xers and Baby Boomers. We've set out to change that. Today, we launch our series Asking Y, a long-term commitment from HuffPost Canada and AOL Canada to report on Generation Y, Millennials, Echo Boomers or those I'll simply refer to as those 30 and younger.
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What Keeps Millennials Up at Night

Within the next decade people in my generation are going to drive the work force, determine government policy and take on greater responsibility within the Canadian economy. By 2020 Millennials will make up over 40 per cent of working-aged Canadians. Here is what's keeping us up at night...