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Rachel Sklar

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How Canada Made Me An Obama Lover

Posted: 11/06/2012 3:29 pm

The year was 1980. I was seven. It was a Wednesday, I know now -- actually, a particular Wednesday, November 5, 1980 -- and as I bounded downstairs to the kitchen for breakfast, my brother stopped me at the door. "Who's the president of the United States?" he asked, testing me in that older brother way. "Jimmy Carter!" I shouted, in that smug younger-sister way. "WRONG!" he yelled, brandishing the front page of the Globe and Mail. "It's Ronald Reagan!"

Well I had never heard of Ronald Reagan and I didn't like being wrong. So that was the end of my interest in American politics, for about 25 years. I remember tuning into President Clinton's inauguration while I was at Western -- Barbra Streisand was singing, after all -- but for me, politics was local, like student council elections or whether my friends really "forgot" to call me before leaving for the party.

I went to law school. Clinton was still president. I moved to New York. Clinton was still president. I visited a boy in D.C. and met him for tea at the Mayflower Hotel, and a bunch of photographers started taking photos of me. Clinton was still president (but barely). I was definitely aware of "the news" but while I may have known who, say, Katherine Harris was (the scary lady on the TV stealing the election), that was pretty much my limit.

I'm pleased to report that all that has changed. In the intervening years, a few scary things happened, and it behooved me to start paying attention. I left law, I joined the media, and, eventually, started actually knowing what the heck was going on. Whoo hoo! I rode the wave of the 24 hour news cycle through the 2008 election -- working for this publication, actually! -- and, four years later, can proudly tell you the difference between a McConnell and a McDonnell, how to pronounce "Boehner" and spell "Reince Priebus," and why HRC is a BFD. I can also tell you why I'd vote for Barack Obama.

I can't actually vote for Barack Obama -- I'm from Canada and it's stamped on my passport as surely as on the way I say "out." But there is no being part of the great churning American media machine -- whether as a viewer, reader, listener, Tweeter, Instagrammer or random Canadian who somehow snuck her way on television -- without forming an opinion. Sometimes, it's even educated! As for me, the more educated I got, the more I came to realize that my support for the 44th President of the United States and his party actually has its roots well north of the border.

Really, every reason I can think of to vote for Barack Obama I learned from Canada. In the language of my people, et voila:

BLOG CONTINUES BELOW SLIDESHOW:

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  • Everyone Deserves Health Care

    I was immensely fortunate to grow up in a country where, when I hurt myself, I went to the hospital (and my father was a doctor, so going the hospital was never scary). There was no agonizing over bills, no worry over the cost of prescriptions, no "Well, I'm near my annual limit, maybe that gangrene will sort itself out" -- there was just health care. (And, if you had a pre-existing condition, you got more health care.) The Affordable Health Care Act -- Obamacare -- covers 50 million people who would otherwise have nothing. Youth coverage, preventative care for women, pre-existing conditions -- I cannot imagine supporting the candidate who would take this away from needy citizens. That would be so...un-Canadian.

  • Women Are Awesome -- And Deserve Equal Awesomeness

    Mitt Romney? Not so much. Under President Obama, contraception for working women like my mom will be available and covered. Looking back on my first 25 years spent in Canada, I don't remember knowing a single person with an unwanted pregnancy, but I definitely knew a lot of people who were having sex. You can do the math -- but either way, that math would not consist of "Transvaginal ultrasound + Legitimate Rape + Personhood = Gift from God." Sheesh.

  • Women On The Supreme Court Are Awesome, Too

    It really was no surprise to me that President Obama would use his two SCOTUS vacancies to appoint two incredible women, Justices Sonia Sotomayor and Elena Kagan. More importantly, it signals what kind of Supreme Court he envisions for this country -- and the kind he will be appointing judges to over the next four years, should a vacancy come up. DID YOU CATCH THAT? THERE MAY BE SUPREME COURT VACANCIES IN THE NEXT FOUR YEARS. I shudder at the thought of a Mitt "Corporations Are People!" Romney filling them. The balance of the court is perhaps the most vital long-term issue to be decided in this election. On that basis alone, President Obama would have my vote. (P.S. Since I left law school, the Canadian Supreme Court has added the Honorable Madam Justice Andromache Karakatsanis. Frankly, I'm not sure a dude of that name would make it past a Republican Congress.)

  • Peace, Order and Good Government

    Coming from a background of Canadian jurisprudence means that at one time, the phrase "Peace Order and Good Government" was scraweled many, many times across my notes (or "POGG" for short). I have found myself thinking of "Peace, Order and Good Government" this past week or so in the wake of Hurricane Sandy, and the debate over whether to fund FEMA or consign disaster relief to the states -- or even better privatize it, as Romney has said. Government is important. It does things for you. It provides the crucial infrastructure to help you get through life, do go and do and yes, build that. President Obama is the candidate who understands that. As president, he will be thinking of the country as a whole -- and how that whole can make life better, collectively, for everyone who is part of it. Don't tell the Libertarians, but yep, that's POGG.

  • Diversity Makes Everything Better

    I grew up knowing I was part of a diverse country, and caring about that enough to paint my face with a giant flag on October 30, 1995 and rally at Nathan Philips Square for unity. My Canada included Quebec. Guess what? That goes double for black people, gay people, poor people, women, Latinos, the 47 per cent, seniors, immigrants -- the various oft-disenfranchised groups that President Obama has proven time and again to be looking out for.

  • Voting Should Be Easy

    I remember elections growing up. I couldn't vote, of course, but my parents could. They'd leave the house, go vote, and come back, usually before I had time to pretend that I had practiced piano for the full half-hour. Why? Because there were no four-hour lineups at Banbury Community Center. If I may, WHAT THE HECK IS GOING ON IN THIS COUNTRY??? I have been appalled by the systemic efforts toward voter suppression that have emerged in 2012. From Florida's Governor Rick Scott narrowing the early-voting window (and cutting off Sundays which could not be more clearly intended to impact black communities) to blatant attempts in Pennsylvania to roll back voter ID laws to "allow Governor Romney to win the state of Pennsylvania" to systemic pushback across numerous states meant to disenfranchise students, veterans, old and poor people -- voter suppression has become a looming national issue this election. It is a dirty, underhanded tactic -- and it's coming from one side only.

Everyone Deserves Health Care

Yes, I'm starting with the obvious one. But COME ON. I can't even imagine how anyone who grew up in Canada could be a Republican. I've been in the US for over a decade and I still don't understand this system. HMO? PPO? Sorry for bleeding all over your emergency room, how many forms do I need to fill out?

I was immensely fortunate to grow up in a country where, when I hurt myself, I went to the hospital (and my father was a doctor, so going the hospital was never scary). There was no agonizing over bills, no worry over the cost of prescriptions, no "Well, I'm near my annual limit, maybe that gangrene will sort itself out" -- there was just health care. (And, if you had a pre-existing condition, you got more health care.) The Affordable Health Care Act -- Obamacare -- covers 50 million people who would otherwise have nothing. Youth coverage, preventative care for women, pre-existing conditions -- I cannot imagine supporting the candidate who would take this away from needy citizens. That would be so...un-Canadian.

Women Are Awesome -- And Deserve Equal Awesomeness


I grew up with a working mom -- a nurse-turned-lawyer who was frequently flying places to speak, had an important-looking briefcase and whom I would often call at the office, occasionally with my sister locked in the bathroom when our brother was terrorizing us. It did not occur to me that this was weird -- or that my mom's work might be worth 77 per cent of my dad's work.


I didn't really ask her about her family planning practices but, well, there were no kids after me. Which meant that she could continue to work, steadily and freely, and build her career. The first thing President Obama did when he took office was enact the Lily Ledbetter Fair Pay act, which was a huge step forward in fighting gender-based discrimination in wages (by making it much easier to launch a lawsuit, thereby actually getting a remedy and potentially discouraging the discrimination before it starts).


Mitt Romney? Not so much. Under President Obama, contraception for working women like my mom will be available and covered. Looking back on my first 25 years spent in Canada, I don't remember knowing a single person with an unwanted pregnancy, but I definitely knew a lot of people who were having sex. You can do the math -- but either way, that math would not consist of "Transvaginal ultrasound + Legitimate Rape + Personhood = Gift from God." Sheesh.


Women On The Supreme Court Are Awesome, Too



I went to law school (holla U of T!). Which means I read a lot of cases from the Canadian Supreme Court. Okay, fine: I read a lot of summaries of cases from the Canadian Supreme Court. But either way it was impossible to escape the incredible contribution women made to Canadian jurisprudence. (We also studied UK and US cases - if I were still in law school, I might make a "Learned Hand" joke, but I'm much too mature for that now.)  It seemed absolutely normal that the Right Honourable Madam Justice Beverly McLachlin would be named Chief Justice of the Supreme Court of Canada - and my God, woe to anyone who would discriminate against women after meeting the Honourable Madam Justice Claire L'Heureux-Dubé. I have never met anyone as terrifyingly impressive as Justice L'Heureux-Dubé. And oh, her dissents! If anyone wonders why I think it's perfectly okay to send you a long email detailing exactly why I disagree with you, blame  L'Heureux-Dubé. Never mind Honourable Madam Justice Rosalie Abella: Canada's youngest Judge, first Jewish judge, and first pregnant judge. Trifecta! Oh and she coined the phrase "employment equity" and the law around it, which was added to the Candian Constitution in 1982. [Brushes off Canadian-feminist-lawyer shoulders]


So - it really was no surprise to me that President Obama would use his two SCOTUS vacancies to appoint two incredible women, Justices Sonia Sotomayor and Elena Kagan. More importantly, it signals what kind of Supreme Court he envisions for this country - and the kind he will be appointing judges to over the next four years, should a vacancy come up. DID YOU CATCH THAT? THERE MAY BE SUPREME COURT VACANCIES IN THE NEXT FOUR YEARS. I shudder at the thought of a Mitt "Corporations Are People!" Romney filling them. The balance of the court is perhaps the most vital long-term issue to be decided in this election. On that basis alone, President Obama would have my vote.
p.s. Since I left law school, the Canadian Supreme Court has added the Honorable  Madam Justice Andromache Karakatsanis. Frankly, I'm not sure a dude of that name would make it past a Republican Congress.


Peace, Order and Good Government 



Coming from a background of Canadian jurisprudence means that at one time, the phrase "Peace Order and Good Government" was scraweled many, many times across my notes (or "POGG" for short). Basically this concept weighs in favor of the ability of the federal government to legislate in matters of the national interest. I'm not going to go ConLaw memory lane, mostly because I don't have a stock "Crown Zellerbach" joke. But more generally, "Peace, Order and Good Government" has always, to me, meant taking care of business.


I can already hear the purists howls from the "Life, Liberty and the Pursuit of Happiness" crowd. SETTLE DOWN. The liberty vs. order fight always seemed silly to me when across the legal systems that bestride our border there is always a balancing of interests. So please, no outraged comments about the War Measures Act of 1970. I have found myself thinking of "Peace, Order and Good Government" this past week or so in the wake of Hurricane Sandy, and the debate over whether to fund FEMA or consign disaster relief to the states - or even better privatize it, as Romney has said. As a Canadian, I grew up with weather. We all had snowpants, great for playing in the huge piles at the end of the driveway from the snowplows. The governmentally-provided snowplows, that kept the streets clear so we could go about our business, unless you live in Winnipeg in which case why are you leaving the house??? It's freezing out there!!!! I know that snowplows and the like are a provincial matter but it's more the general ethos: Government is important. It does things for you. It provides the crucial infrastructure to help you get through life, do go and do and yes, build that. President Obama is the candidate who understands that. As president, he will be thinking of the country as a whole - and how that whole can make life better, collectively, for everyone who is part of it. Don't tell the Libertarians, but yep, that's POGG.


Diversity Makes Everything Better



I grew up in Ontario, took French as part of a full curriculum for 13 years of schooling. I remember Matt McFadzean at the front of Grade 4 French class flinging his leg up on the table as he said the word "chou." Three decades later, I still know that means "cabbage." I remember Mlle Leroux teaching us "Les Raftsmen" in Grade 8 and Madame Hornich in Grade 12 letting me give my Victor Hugo presentation in the form of a song written to the tune of "Master Of The House" from Lés Miserables ( ("Victor Hugo était un auteur qui/A vraiment incarné l'esprit de génie")). I know where to find the sortie, how to arrêter (even if I can't conjugate it), and when I don't know le mot approprié, how to crack a joke (hint: just say "Pamplemousse!" Everyone loves that word.) I grew up knowing I was part of a diverse country, and caring about that enough to paint my face with a giant flag on October 30, 1995 and rally at Nathan Philips Square for unity. My Canada included Quebec.


Guess what? That goes double for black people, gay people, poor people, women, Latinos, the 47 per cent, seniors, immigrants - the various oft-disenfranchised groups that President Obama has proven time and again to be looking out for. He supports gay marriage. He supports The Dream Act. He's the first black president, and coincidentally the one about whom the rallying cry of "We want our country back" was coined. Not entirely a stretch.  It's become very clear over the course of this campaign that one candidate represents all Americans, and one candidate represents a more...select bunch. One candidate recognizes "E Pluribus Unum" because he's lived it.  My vote would be for President Obama - the candidate of diversity, by diversity and for diversity.


Voting Should Be Easy



I remember elections growing up. I couldn't vote, of course, but my parents could. They'd leave the house, go vote, and come back, usually before I had time to pretend that I had practiced piano for the full half-hour. Why? Because there were no four-hour lineups at Banbury Community Center. If I may, WHAT THE HECK IS GOING ON IN THIS COUNTRY??? I have been appalled by the systemic efforts toward voter suppression that have emerged in 2012. From Florida's Governor Rick Scott narrowing the early-voting window (and cutting off Sundays which could not be more clearly intended to impact black communities) to blatant attempts in Pennsylvania to roll back voter ID laws to "allow Governor Romney to win the state of Pennsylvania" to systemic pushback across numerous states meant to disenfranchise  students, veterans, old and poor people - voter suppression has become a looming national issue this election. It is a dirty, underhanded tactic - and it's coming from one side only. As someone living in the USA who can't vote, I definitely sympathize. My wholly ceremonial and totally imaginary Canadian vote is with President Obama, and the inalienable Constitutional rights that his side, at least, is striving to uphold.



There's more - oh, to have the time to figure out how to work in a "Bobcaygeon" reference! - but I'll stop there because really any of these reasons is enough. Today is a decisive day for my adopted country, where I live and work and care based on the values I grew up with in my home country. It doesn't feel that different for me, hopping between New York and Toronto - mostly I am struck by the sudden availability of butter tarts and Shreddies - and this is because both Canada and the U.S. are great nations built on democratic ideals and the notion of individual human rights intertwined with the power of the collective. The path forward is not always smooth - I also didn't vote in the Toronto mayoral election so don't look at me - but, to borrow a phrase, it arcs toward progress. Today, as my friends here on the southern side of the border vote, I will close my eyes and urge them on to choose a steward who can move deftly and confidently forward even where it seems shaky, eyes forward, sure-footed, stepping lightly.


He's easy for me to recognize. I met him decades ago, thanks to the National Film Board of Canada.

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  • Here's a look at the issues he and other Canada-U.S. watchers feel will land on the big desk in the Oval Office in the months and years to come. <strong><em>With files from CBC</em></strong>

  • Energy Policy

    Wilkins puts energy policy at the top of the list of Canadian issues facing the next U.S. president. "It is a huge part of our trade relationship and obviously the controversial issue right now is the approval of the Keystone pipeline," said Wilkins. "I think that has the most immediate and profound impact on the relationship of the two countries. It can mean thousands of jobs in the U.S. It can mean more Canadian energy flowing to the U.S. and would give us a little more energy independence from some of the other countries that we depend on that don't necessarily like us, like Venezuela." Romney has said he will approve Keystone XL, a 1,900-kilometre project that would carry oilsands crude from Alberta to the U.S. Gulf Coast. Obama initially welcomed TransCanada Corp.'s $7.6-billion plan, but put it temporarily on hold late last year, asking the State Department to take another look at a new route that would bypass the environmentally sensitive Sandhills area in Nebraska. Keystone XL has faced significant opposition from environmentalists, who both oppose oilsands development and view the pipeline itself as an ecological disaster waiting to happen. Don Abelson, director of the Canada-U.S. Institute at Western University in London, Ont., says energy policy is a critical cross-border issue that's not going to go away. "Both Obama and Romney are very well aware of what's going on in Western Canada and how the United States could benefit from that, so there's been a lot of discussion about North American energy independence and lessening their dependence on the Middle East."

  • Trade

    In his view, Abelson says "first and foremost" among the Canadian issues facing the next U.S. president is "our concern about trade and the border." "It's always a concern that not only the next president but the next Congress looks favourably upon the importance of the trade relationship between the two countries and that as committed as both countries are to maintaining a secure border, that they don't lose sight of the importance of allowing for the unfettered movement of goods and services." In the past four years, there have been some protectionist tendencies on the U.S. side, including Buy America clauses in bills, one of which, restricting public works projects to U.S.-made steel and manufactured goods, was passed by Congress "I think there was some expectation that when Barack Obama became president in 2008 that he would not be as committed to thickening the border," says Abelson. But "clearly he has been." Wilkins, a Republican, also feels that Buy America clauses are protectionist and not helpful. "I'm hopeful that they won't come up again, but I think if you have an Obama administration the likelihood is higher than if you have a Romney administration."

  • Border Security

    Late last year, Canada and the U.S. signed a new perimeter security and trade agreement that aimed to make everything from travel to cross-border business easier. But the deal came with negotiations to ease American security concerns and means the two countries will share information about who enters and exits the country. Canada will adopt two U.S. screening measures: an electronic travel authorization for visitors who don't need visas to travel to Canada, and a system to deny boarding to inadmissible passengers before they get on the plane. Security at the border is another "huge" Canadian issue for the next U.S. president, but Abelson doesn't think it will necessarily become harder for people crossing from one country to another. "I think we'll continue to see co-operation between both countries in terms of sharing intelligence and information," he says, adding that more is also going to have to be done when it comes to border infrastructure such as bridges and roads.

  • Foreign Policy

    Abelson says Canada should be concerned about the foreign policy direction of the next U.S. administration. "I don't think Canadians have the appetite or the stomach for going back to a time where the United States was putting pressure on us to become involved in military conflicts," he says, adding "the issue that's going to be on the agenda of the next president will be Iran and possibly Syria. "From a Canadian perspective, we want to be very careful that regardless of who's occupying the Oval Office, that we are not under pressure or put under intense pressure to become involved in future military conflicts unless our direct national security interests are at stake." And then there's China. Canada's navy played a key role this summer in the world's largest international naval exercise, which has as a main worry the possibility of a less-than-friendly China. The U.S. was a big player in the exercise, and it came about six months after Obama signalled a foreign policy "pivot," pointing to the Pacific rather than keeping the longstanding focus on the Middle East and Europe. With Prime Minister Stephen Harper's government also signalling great interest in selling resources like oil to China, Canada could find itself in a rather sensitive spot reconciling those sometimes differing perspectives.

  • The Economy

    Gary Doer, Canada's ambassador to the U.S., told reporters earlier this month that one of the most important issues for Canada in the U.S. election will be whether the winner can avoid sending the U.S. economy over the so-called "fiscal cliff." Obama and the Republican-controlled Congress have been deadlocked over the U.S. budget and face a Jan. 1 deadline for a deal. If there isn't one, a series of pre-set spending cuts and tax increases kick in and could have the effect of slowing an already fragile U.S. economic recovery. Doer wouldn't say which candidate or party he feels is best equipped to break the budget impasse in Congress. But no matter who wins an election that in the U.S. has focused primarily on the economy, Abelson sees a huge challenge getting the agreement needed on Capital Hill to sort out the looming budget and debt questions. "I agree with Gary Doer that of course the economy is the most important issue, but as we saw during the discussion over the debt crisis, how bad do things have to become for both sides to work together?" Every country in the world, Canada included, is affected by how the U.S. economy plays out, suggests Abelson. "Our trade relationship, the spillover effect into our own country, of course, that's one of the reasons we need to pay very close attention to what's going on in Washington."

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  • Barack Obama, Bruce Springsteen

    President Barack Obama stands with singer Bruce Springsteen as he arrives to speak at a campaign event, Monday, Nov. 5, 2012, in Madison, Wis. (AP Photo/Carolyn Kaster)

  • Barack Obama, Bruce Springsteen

    President Barack Obama, accompanied by singer Bruce Springsteen, waves as he arrive at a campaign event near the State Capitol Building in Madison, Wis., Monday, Nov. 5, 2012. (AP Photo/Pablo Martinez Monsivais)

  • Barack Obama, Bruce Springsteen

    President Barack Obama is greeted by onstage by singer Bruce Springsteen as he arrives to speak at a campaign event, Monday, Nov. 5, 2012, in downtown Madison, Wis. (AP Photo/Carolyn Kaster)

  • Barack Obama, Bruce Springsteen

    President Barack Obama shakes hands with singer Bruce Springsteen at a campaign event, Monday, Nov. 5, 2012, in downtown Madison, Wis. (AP Photo/Carolyn Kaster)

  • Bruce Springsteen

    Singer Bruce Springsteen performs before the start of a campaign event for President Barack Obama near the State Capitol Building in Madison, Wis., Monday, Nov. 5, 2012. (AP Photo/Pablo Martinez Monsivais)

  • Joe Biden

    Vice President Joe Biden gestures while speaking a campaign rally at Heritage Farm Museum at Claude Moore Park, Monday, Nov. 5, 2012, in Sterling , VA. (AP Photo/Matt Rourke)

  • Paul Ryan

    Republican vice presidential candidate, Rep. Paul Ryan, R-Wis., speaks during a campaign event at the Douglas County Fairgrounds, Sunday, Nov. 4, 2012 in Castle Rock, Colo. (AP Photo/Mary Altaffer)

  • Paul Ryan

    Republican vice presidential candidate, Rep. Paul Ryan, R-Wis., and his wife Janna arrive at a campaign event at the Douglas County Fairgrounds, Sunday, Nov. 4, 2012, in Castle Rock, Colo. (AP Photo/Mary Altaffer)

  • Barack Obama

    President Barack Obama speaks during a campaign event at McArthur High School in Hollywood, Fla. Sunday, Nov. 4, 2012. (AP Photo/Terry Renna)

  • Mitt Romney

    Republican presidential candidate, former Massachusetts Gov. Mitt Romney speaks during a campaign event at Shady Brook Farm, Sunday, Nov. 4, 2012, in Morrisville, Pa. (AP Photo/David Goldman)

  • Elizabeth Warren, Bruce Mann

    Democratic candidate for the U.S. Senate, Elizabeth Warren, left, waves to an audience while standing with her husband, Bruce Mann, at the conclusion of a campaign rally at a high school in Braintree, Mass., Sunday, Nov. 4, 2012. Both Warren and incumbent U.S. Sen. Scott Brown, R-Mass., continue their push around the state in the final days before Election Day. (AP Photo/Steven Senne)

  • Barack Obama,

    President Barack Obama extends his arm and fingers to greet young supporters after speaking at a campaign event at Fifth Third Arena, Sunday, Nov. 4, 2012, in Cincinnati. (AP Photo/Pablo Martinez Monsivais)

  • Mitt Romney

    Republican presidential candidate and former Massachusetts Gov. Mitt Romney greets supporters at a Virginia campaign rally at Newport News International Airport, in Newport News, Va., Sunday, Nov. 4, 2012. (AP Photo/Charles Dharapak)

  • Barack Obama

    President Barack Obama arrives to a cheering crowd at a campaign event at the Fifth Third Arena on the University of Cincinnati campus, Sunday, Nov. 4, 2012, in Cincinnati. (AP Photo/Carolyn Kaster)

  • Mitt Romney

    Republican presidential candidate and former Massachusetts Gov. Mitt Romney waves as fireworks are seen in the distance at a Virginia campaign rally at Newport News International Airport, in Newport News, Va., Sunday, Nov. 4, 2012. (AP Photo/Charles Dharapak)

  • Barack Obama

    President Barack Obama greets a cheering crowd as he arrives at a campaign event at the Fifth Third Arena on the University of Cincinnati campus, Sunday, Nov. 4, 2012, in Cincinnati. (AP Photo/Carolyn Kaster)

  • Elizabeth Warren, John Kerry

    Democratic candidate for the U.S. Senate Elizabeth Warren, left, clasps hands with her husband, Bruce Mann, as U.S. Sen. John Kerry, D-Mass., center, shakes hands at the conclusion of a campaign rally at a high school in Braintree, Mass., Sunday, Nov. 4, 2012. Both Warren and incumbent U.S. Sen. Scott Brown, R-Mass., continue their push around the state in the final days before Election Day. (AP Photo/Steven Senne)

  • Barack Obama,

    President Barack Obama starts to move to the music of performer Stevie Wonder who was off-stage performing at the end of the campaign event at Fifth Third Arena, Sunday, Nov. 4, 2012, in Cincinnati. (AP Photo/Pablo Martinez Monsivais)

  • Mitt Romney, Ann Romney

    Republican presidential candidate and former Massachusetts Gov. Mitt Romney and his wife Ann Romney take the stage at a Pennsylvania campaign rally at Shady Brook Farm, in Morrisville, Pa., Sunday, Nov. 4, 2012. (AP Photo/Charles Dharapak)

  • Barack Obama

    President Barack Obama gives the thumb-up as he finishes speaking at a campaign event at the Fifth Third Arena on the University of Cincinnati campus, Sunday, Nov. 4, 2012, in Cincinnati. (AP Photo/Carolyn Kaster)

  • Women hold up signs spelling "vote" on a stage being prepared for a speech by President Barack Obama at a campaign rally at the Community College of Aurora, in Denver, Sunday, Nov. 4, 2012. (AP Photo/Brennan Linsley)

  • Mitt Romney, Ann Romney

    Republican presidential candidate and former Massachusetts Gov. Mitt Romney and his wife Ann Romney arrive on stage at a Pennsylvania campaign rally at Shady Brook Farm, in Morrisville, Pa., Sunday, Nov. 4, 2012. (AP Photo/Charles Dharapak)

  • Elizabeth Warren, John Kerry

    United States Sen. John Kerry, D-Mass., front, and Democratic candidate for the U.S. Senate Elizabeth Warren, behind left, face reporters before a campaign rally at a high school in Braintree, Mass., Sunday, Nov. 4, 2012. Both Warren and incumbent U.S. Sen. Scott Brown, R-Mass., continue their push around the state in the final days before Election Day. (AP Photo/Steven Senne)

  • A long line of early voters runs down the block outside the Hamilton County Board of Elections building Sunday evening, Nov. 4, 2012, in Cincinnati. The women in the front of the line said they had been in line four hours. (AP Photo/Al Behrman)

  • Elizabeth Warren, John Kerry

    Democratic candidate for the U.S. Senate, Elizabeth Warren, left, and U.S. Sen. John Kerry, D-Mass., walk and talk as they arrive at a campaign rally at a high school in Braintree, Mass., Sunday, Nov. 4, 2012. Both Warren and incumbent U.S. Sen. Scott Brown, R-Mass., continue their push around the state in the final days before Election Day. (AP Photo/Steven Senne)

  • Elizabeth Warren

    Democratic candidate for the U.S. Senate, Elizabeth Warren addresses an audience during a campaign rally at a high school in Braintree, Mass., Sunday, Nov. 4, 2012. Both Warren and incumbent U.S. Sen. Scott Brown, R-Mass., continue their push around the state in the final days before Election Day. Warren was introduced by U.S. Sen. John Kerry, D-Mass., at the rally. (AP Photo/Steven Senne)

  • Elizabeth Warren, John Kerry

    Democratic candidate for the U.S. Senate Elizabeth Warren, left, and U.S. Sen. John Kerry, D-Mass., right, walk and talk as they arrive at a campaign rally at a high school in Braintree, Mass., Sunday, Nov. 4, 2012. Both Warren and incumbent U.S. Sen. Scott Brown, R-Mass., continue their push around the state in the final days before Election Day. (AP Photo/Steven Senne)

  • Elizabeth Warren, John Kerry

    Democratic candidate for the U.S. Senate, Elizabeth Warren, left, addresses an audience during a campaign rally at a high school in Braintree, Mass., as U.S. Sen. John Kerry, D-Mass., right, applauds, Sunday, Nov. 4, 2012. Both Warren and incumbent U.S. Sen. Scott Brown, R-Mass., continue their push around the state in the final days before Election Day. (AP Photo/Steven Senne)

  • Mitt Romney

    Republican presidential candidate and former Massachusetts Gov. Mitt Romney greets the crowd at a Pennsylvania campaign rally at Shady Brook Farm, in Morrisville, Pa., Sunday, Nov. 4, 2012. (AP Photo/Charles Dharapak)

  • Barack Obama

    President Barack Obama waves to the crowd as he speaks at a campaign event at the Fifth Third Arena on the University of Cincinnati campus, Sunday, Nov. 4, 2012, in Cincinnati. (AP Photo/Carolyn Kaster)

  • Barack Obama

    President Barack Obama speaks at a campaign event at the Fifth Third Arena on the University of Cincinnati campus, Sunday, Nov. 4, 2012, in Cincinnati. (AP Photo/Carolyn Kaster)

  • Barack Obama

    President Barack Obama speaks at a campaign event at the Fifth Third Arena on the University of Cincinnati campus, Sunday, Nov. 4, 2012, in Cincinnati. (AP Photo/Carolyn Kaster)

  • Joe Biden

    Vice President Joe Biden speaks during a campaign rally at Rushville Middle School, Sunday, Nov. 4, 2012, in Lancaster, Ohio. (AP Photo/Matt Rourke)

  • Joe Biden

    Supporters cheer as Vice President Joe Biden speaks during a campaign rally at Rushville Middle School, Sunday, Nov. 4, 2012, in Lancaster, Ohio. (AP Photo/Matt Rourke)

  • Barack Obama

    President Barack Obama waves to the crowd as he leaves the stage after speaking at a campaign event at the Fifth Third Arena on the University of Cincinnati campus, Sunday, Nov. 4, 2012, in Cincinnati. (AP Photo/Carolyn Kaster)

  • Former President Bill Clinton walks through the crowd after speaking at a rally for Barack Obama at Pullen Park in Raleigh, N.C., Sunday, Nov. 4, 2012.The former president has been traveling to several battleground states over the past week to try to stem any Republican tide for Mitt Romney and preserve Obama leads. (AP/Ted Richardson)

  • Former President Bill Clinton, right, arrives at a rally for Barack Obama at Pullen Park in Raleigh, N.C., Sunday, Nov. 4, 2012, after being introduced by former North Carolina Governor Jim Hunt, left. The former president has been traveling to several battleground states over the past week to try to stem any Republican tide for Mitt Romney and preserve Obama leads. (AP/Ted Richardson)

  • Joe Biden

    A supporter cheers as Vice President Joe Biden speaks during a campaign rally Terra Community College, Sunday, Nov. 4, 2012, in Fremont, Ohio. (AP Photo/Matt Rourke)

  • Joe Biden

    Vice President Joe Biden speaks during a campaign rally Terra Community College, Sunday, Nov. 4, 2012, in Fremont, Ohio. (AP Photo/Matt Rourke)

  • Mitt Romney

    Republican presidential candidate and former Massachusetts Gov. Mitt Romney speaks at a Virginia campaign rally at Newport News International Airport, in Newport News, Va., Sunday, Nov. 4, 2012. (AP Photo/Charles Dharapak)

  • Paul Ryan

    Republican vice presidential candidate, Rep. Paul Ryan, R-Wis., greets supporters during a campaign event at the Douglas County Fairgrounds, Sunday, Nov. 4, 2012, in Castle Rock, Colo. (AP Photo/Mary Altaffer)

  • Paul Ryan

    Supporters cheer as Republican vice presidential candidate, Rep. Paul Ryan, R-Wis., speaks during a campaign event, Sunday, Nov. 4, 2012, in Mansfield, Ohio. (AP Photo/Mary Altaffer)

 

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