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Stephanie Caldwell's Comments

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Justice Demanded For Tortured 'Puppy Doe,' Pit Bull Given Away On Craigslist And Brutally Abused

Justice Demanded For Tortured 'Puppy Doe,' Pit Bull Given Away On Craigslist And Brutally Abused

Commented Sep 27, 2013 at 09:26:07 in Crime

“So true, and now with the AgGag laws they are trying to make it illegal for anyone to expose what happens in those windowless mass warehouses full of tortured animals.

My heart aches for all of the innocent lives destroyed by people :(”
Jennifer Chong, Pinterest's 2nd Most Popular User, On What Puts Pinners In A Tizzy

Jennifer Chong, Pinterest's 2nd Most Popular User, On What Puts Pinners In A Tizzy

Commented Jul 10, 2012 at 12:53:57 in Technology

“I wonder why you don't have any fans? ...”

Brogrammer on Jul 10, 2012 at 22:17:40

“Yes, fans are everything.”

RubyCrystal on Jul 10, 2012 at 21:08:39

“Dude you only have 4 fans yourself. Newbies like us have a ways to go to get a lot of fans.”

blessed child on Jul 10, 2012 at 20:43:27

“Could it be because he currently has 28 comments and registered his account last June?”
Jennifer Chong, Pinterest's 2nd Most Popular User, On What Puts Pinners In A Tizzy

Jennifer Chong, Pinterest's 2nd Most Popular User, On What Puts Pinners In A Tizzy

Commented Jul 10, 2012 at 12:53:21 in Technology

“WHATEVER Pinterest haters!

I love that freaking site. Just yesterday I made an awesome beer canned chicken in the crock pot thanks to a recipe I found on there.

Haters will hate and pinners will pin. My husband thinks it's stupid, but he wasn't complaining at dinner last night :)

(btw I'm not a house wife, I don't wear horn rimmed glasses and all my coffee I drink comes from my coffee pot, I work 40 hrs a week and I don't have kids. You have no idea the squeels of excitement that can come from grown adults over jello oceans in a fish bowl. Just sayin...)”

Brogrammer on Jul 10, 2012 at 22:17:17

“Thank you for being a consumer. It helps developers such as myself realize that we need to stop giving so much credit to the end-user's intelligence, and go with impulse related technology.”

Stefan Dembowski on Jul 10, 2012 at 15:33:23

“O, I'm not a hater, but I honestly don't get it.
To each their own, IMO.”

natal plum on Jul 10, 2012 at 14:02:45

“Did you know that when sheep are returning to the barn (baaaaaa) that if you put a stick across the entrance way that the first five or six sheep will jump over the stick (baaaaaa) on their way in? Thereafter if you remove the stick the rest of the flock will continue to jump over the spot where the stick was (baaaaaa). Why? Because they are sheep (baaaaa). Enjoy your coffee pot, jello and canned chicken like the other two million followers of J. Chong.”
Why I Told My Kids About My Eating Disorder

Why I Told My Kids About My Eating Disorder

Commented May 3, 2013 at 11:29:10 in Canada Living

“You're welcome Marci :)

I think your messages are incredibly positive and I love your work :)”
Why I Told My Kids About My Eating Disorder

Why I Told My Kids About My Eating Disorder

Commented May 3, 2013 at 11:12:23 in Canada Living

“You keep talking about "letting your kids see you in that state" as if it's an option. You clearly have no real conception of what mental illness is (including eating disorders and addiction). A person suffering from any untreated mental illness, including eating disorders, is consumed by it, is the living embodiment of it, and there is no hiding it.

Your kids will always wonder why you are keeping secrets from them. And secrets cause a lot of problems. Not only does the kid have to deal with the fact that something is wrong, they now have to try and understand why their parent kept secrets from them, or lied to them, or acted weird around them. You can't choose your illness, but you can choose to be open with your family. Communication strengthens relationships, & brings people together.

Knowing the why lets mom own her problems. It allows the kids to grow up knowing that even though mom had a problem, it wasn't their problem or their responsibility. The kids will learn to come to terms on their own through life, weather it's resolved or not. And with an open line of communication with their mom, they now have mom to support them in that. When we understand something we are less afraid. And teaching your children the lesson that having a problem, or talking about it is nothing to be ashamed of is a really important one to learn.”

Marci WarhaftNadler on May 4, 2013 at 00:01:09

“There is so much stigma attached to mental illness, eating disorders and addiction that seeking help for it can be humiliating and terrifying. There are still so many people who don't understand that these are not choices. Nobody chooses to be ill. I learned a long time ago that while I'm not responsible for my disorder, I am responsible for my recovery and I've worked incredibly hard to get well with obstacle upon obstacle being thrown in my way. I think that people who have dealt with similar issues know that secrecy is not the way to go.

In life, not many problems are solved by ignoring them or pretending they don't exist. In most cases, when we actually deal with an issue head on, we can work through it and get past it. Much healthier. Once again, thank you Stephanie for sharing your wisdom and insight! xo”
Why I Told My Kids About My Eating Disorder

Why I Told My Kids About My Eating Disorder

Commented May 3, 2013 at 10:48:14 in Canada Living

“Openness and honesty only strengthens relationships. ALL relationships. Kids know when something is wrong weather you tell them or not. Being open with your kids and letting them know that what is wrong is not their fault is important. There are enough feelings to handle when a parent has a problem, knowing that it's not your fault and that it's ok to talk about it can only help.”
Why I Told My Kids About My Eating Disorder

Why I Told My Kids About My Eating Disorder

Commented May 2, 2013 at 16:03:23 in Canada Living

“I think this is a wonderful article. As an adult who grew up in a household with a mother that was very, seriously mentally ill and unstable/ unmanaged for most of my life, I wish I could have the kind f closure and release from guilt that comes from being the child of a disabled parent. I realize that eating disorders are not the same as other forms of mental illness, but they are a mental illness. Kids of parents with mental illnesses experience life a little differently than others, feeling helpless and guilty, sometimes shame. The guilt and shame that you bear as a child and into adulthood can be crippling. The guilt comes from not being able to fix your parent, not "being good enough" for them to change and get better (weather they are capable of actually getting better or not, mentally or physically). It's irrational but that's exactly what happens. Ask any therapist. This woman's children will grow up free of that! Because mommy sat down and explained exactly what was wrong, and that she is better now, and it had nothing to do with them. She owned her problems and corrected them and now lives a happy, VERY inspirational life. She celebrates her life and her body, and her body image and teaches her kids the same. Bravo Marci!”

Marci WarhaftNadler on May 2, 2013 at 17:16:42

“Incredible Insight, Stephanie!!
Thank you so much for sharing it. The last thing I would want is for my kids to feel in any way responsible for the things I did or the way I felt. They need to know that it's MY problem. They need to see that while my disorder is a part of me it certainly doesn't define me. I hope my kids will learn that you can't always tell by looking at someone what they may be dealing with and that everybody deserves compassion. I hope they also learn to always be kind and compassionate with themselves as well. I truly appreciate your comment! :o)”

LockeDemosthenes on May 2, 2013 at 17:15:18

“I don't know why you assume that talking to your kids about illness, would spare them from the negative fallout from it. It can still set up an unhealthy dynamic in the parent child relationship.”