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Harper Government Rebranding: Taxpayers Spent Over $86,000 Helping Tories Rebrand Federal Government

Harper Government Rebranding: Taxpayers Spent Over $86,000 Helping Tories Rebrand Federal Government

Commented Jun 25, 2012 at 10:35:44 in Canada Politics

“Please read what I wrote before responding. It is a worldwide trend. If it is cause for concern, then we should condemn all governments that engage in it. Sorry, but I don't see that.

If you actually tried the link I provided before spouting off you would have noticed that the links listed in the search are for Ontario Government websites only. The count is many times higher on Google. Many of the links are on media sites so McGuinty's branding exercise (with Ontario taxpayers' money) is evidently working.”
Harper Government Rebranding: Taxpayers Spent Over $86,000 Helping Tories Rebrand Federal Government

Harper Government Rebranding: Taxpayers Spent Over $86,000 Helping Tories Rebrand Federal Government

Commented Jun 25, 2012 at 09:57:08 in Canada Politics

“This is a common, and perhaps worrisome, phenomenon in modern politics, yet somehow it is only an affront when Stephen Harper does it. For a little perspective, try searching the phrase "McGuinty Government" on the Ontario government web site at http://www.ontario.ca/en/residents/index.htm

When I tried it, I got 44,212 hits. Where's the outrage about the Ontario Liberals doing this?”

Tyler Austin on Jun 25, 2012 at 10:20:01

“So the excuse is, as ususal, the "Liberals did it so we can".

And are you SURE those 40,000 odd 'hits' you found online were not just passing references in news articels and not officailly changed documents?
Cuz I think they were.”
Jan Wong On Depression: Journalist Talks About Struggle And Recovery

Jan Wong On Depression: Journalist Talks About Struggle And Recovery

Commented May 7, 2012 at 14:54:57 in Canada Living

“I was never a fan of Jan Wong, but some of the comments on this thread are downright vicious. As a former resident of Quebec, I do think her comments on the situation in Quebec were quite brave and needed to be said. I had this to say about it at the time:

http://comfyfur.blogspot.ca/2006/09/voting-with-their-feet.html

rffyyz on May 8, 2012 at 09:15:27

“I believe that separatists are opportunists, and have led their believers along a path that they are the sole beneficiaries ... but we have a democracy that permits them to continue their agenda ... which begs ... why do the Bloc still collect Canada pensions?”
huffingtonpost entry

Why I Disagree With Mitch Wolfe's Blog on Don Cherry

Commented Dec 6, 2013 at 19:38:46 in Canada

“What happened to you Samuel? It's a schtick. And Cherry's schtick goes over very well with a surprisingly wide demographic.

There is nothing inconsistent in Cherry presence on Hockey Night in Canada with the CBC's mandate. He entertains; he is widely followed; he is distinctively Canadian; he contributes to our shared identity; and he probably drinks Tim Horton's coffee. Lighten up.”
huffingtonpost entry

The Proposal That Could Make Cab Drivers Safer

Commented Apr 9, 2013 at 23:01:46 in Canada

“If shields make so much sense, how did the industry get by for decades without them? And what's the point of your argument that many taxi drivers are well educated? Many of them are not. While it's good that they are earning a living, this stylized fact has little relevance to the issue at hand.

Also, I'm pretty sure that taxis would still service their brakes if they were not regulated. Their insurance premiums would be punitive if they did not. However, I don't see insurance companies pressuring taxi companies to install shields by imposing higher premiums, so perhaps this is not the issue that politicians and the writer seem to think it is.”
huffingtonpost entry

The Proposal That Could Make Cab Drivers Safer

Commented Apr 9, 2013 at 18:49:23 in Canada

“Without any meaningful statistics, this article fails to make the case that shields should be mandatory. There is nothing stopping any cab driver from installing a shield voluntarily if they deem it to be worth the cost. The taxi companies and their drivers are free to do the calculation as to the tradeoffs between increased personal risk, skipped fares and, possibly, lower insurance costs. Since shields are not common, they evidently deem it not to be worth the cost.

Imposing the cost of shields on passengers, as suggested, would only raise the price of taxi services and result in reduced demand. Hence, fewer taxi drivers would be needed. This is a bad idea.”

pinkibus on Apr 9, 2013 at 22:03:10

“Please stint. The cost of brakes lowers insurance costs. Shields make sense and so does a mandatory payment prior to entering the cab, especially at night. Cab drivers should not be exposed to danger every time they pick up a customer. As the article stated, they are some of the best educated people you have ever met and the fact that they have to drive a cab is an indictment on our society.”
TTC Boss Byford Tackles Stroller Debate

TTC Boss Byford Tackles Stroller Debate

Commented Jan 25, 2013 at 20:14:00 in Canada Living

“That was the point of my comment about painting lines on the steps. The goal is to discourage large strollers from clogging public transit, not make money. If someone disputes the call, just ask them to show that the stroller wheels fit between the lines.”
TTC Boss Byford Tackles Stroller Debate

TTC Boss Byford Tackles Stroller Debate

Commented Jan 25, 2013 at 20:09:17 in Canada Living

“A smart dad actually.”
TTC Boss Byford Tackles Stroller Debate

TTC Boss Byford Tackles Stroller Debate

Commented Jan 22, 2013 at 14:19:57 in Canada Living

“When my daughter was young, we had two strollers - a regular Perego and an umbrella stroller. We used the umbrella stroller whenever we took public transit, though the other stroller was relatively compact by today's standards. In my view, it is rude, if not selfish, to board a bus or subway with some of the behemoths on the market today.

People with large strollers should be charged extra to take public transit. Similar to the restrictions airlines put on carry-on luggage, the TTC should consider placing limits on the width of strollers, which if not met result in a surcharge. Lines indicating acceptable widths could be marked at subway entrances and on the steps into buses and streetcars.”

kingston100 on Jan 23, 2013 at 15:06:54

“While I agree that there should be a limit to the size of a stroller, I can't imagine how this can be inforced. Would bus drivers have measuring tapes, or would it be a judgement call? If it is a judgement call, then I can picture lots of arguments between drivers and parents who were told by one driver that their stroller was permitted, and by another that it isn't. Wouldn't this just slow things down more?”

cinderelladressmaker on Jan 22, 2013 at 15:19:44

“Smart mommy you are!”
Forget Magnotta: Three Canadian Newsmakers Worth Remembering

Forget Magnotta: Three Canadian Newsmakers Worth Remembering

Commented Dec 24, 2012 at 13:41:49 in Canada

“Some worthy alternatives John. Too bad the Huffington Post does not agree. They chose to illustrate your article with a pictorial history of that notorious murderer.”
huffingtonpost entry

Proof Harper Prefers Fake to Real Lakes

Commented Jul 11, 2012 at 15:30:08 in Canada Politics

“Sorry, but that's how it works under a first-past-the post system. Almost 40% of those who voted did vote Conservative. If Canada had a preferential voting system, they would have likely taken more than 50% of the vote.

Unfortunately, the opinions of the 38.4% of the population who didn't bother to vote don't count. Implicitly, they accept the preferences of those who did.”

recumbentguy on Jul 11, 2012 at 16:24:56

“Fact remains, only 24% of eligible Canadians voted for the Harper government. No wishful thinking here, just the facts.”
huffingtonpost entry

Proof Harper Prefers Fake to Real Lakes

Commented Jul 11, 2012 at 14:48:29 in Canada Politics

“Last I heard, we choose our governments by electing them. You will have full recourse at the ballot box in the next election if you convince enough other people not to vote Conservative again. In the meantime, get used to it. Canadians elected them to a majority government.”

js121 on Jul 11, 2012 at 18:42:25

“Don't bother electing Liberals, either. They, too, are part of the New Right Austerity Agenda. We need either NDP or a new party.”

Whistlejackett on Jul 11, 2012 at 16:08:17

“Get used to it? You think getting used to all this temporary job hype should be gotten used to? Do you have any idea how destructive and short sighted that phrase is? People that use that phrase are usually overwhelmed without an option or the energy to find one. If we lived by the value that statement implies, our country will be totally destroyed.

Suzuki's argument is a perfect example of how not to "get used to it." Big Oil wants all of us to get used to it, for example the Ceyhan and the Nabucco pipe lines. Communities have been destroyed completely, and the people are dying, the jobs are gone and the land is useless. I know you didn't invent the phrase, but it is time for responsible people to stop using it as an excuse to do nothing.”

recumbentguy on Jul 11, 2012 at 15:07:43

“Actually 24% of eligible Canadians elected them to a "majority" government.”
Anglophone Media Using Protest to Attack All Things Quebec

Anglophone Media Using Protest to Attack All Things Quebec

Commented Jun 1, 2012 at 11:24:15 in Canada Politics

“Whereas Pierre Karl Péladeau and Power Corp have only the best interests of Québec at heart.”
Quebec Student Protests: Police Kettle, Arrest Hundreds (PHOTOS)

Quebec Student Protests: Police Kettle, Arrest Hundreds (PHOTOS)

Commented May 24, 2012 at 13:41:29 in Canada

“Your hyperbole is part of the problem. Although Charest's leadership is problematic, he does lead a democratically elected government.

So how is it responsible for a small minority of students to hold Quebec society - its government and people - to ransom because they don't agree with a legitimate decision to raise tuition fees?

And to think I had encouraged my daughter to go university in Montreal because the tuition is lower! Fortunately, she has decided to go to school in Ontario.”

aforbes808 on May 24, 2012 at 14:03:15

“I apologize. I am speaking from an American perspective. Our children have shone a light of injustice and we remain willfully blind. In my opinion? The root of every bodies {sic} problem is that we in America bought a lie and set it loose on the world. Our "Distinguished Gentlemen" has sold our country to the highest bidder. So again, I'm sorry, I don't know enough about Canada's problems, but I should.”
Quebec Student Protests: Police Kettle, Arrest Hundreds (PHOTOS)

Quebec Student Protests: Police Kettle, Arrest Hundreds (PHOTOS)

Commented May 24, 2012 at 13:22:17 in Canada

“I certainly hope you don't have children.”

aforbes808 on May 24, 2012 at 13:29:43

“I do, and his future, like those students who are protesting, has been destroyed. I take responsibility for having faith in a rigged system. Have you ever seen a mother protect her children in the wild? It usually doesn't end up so well for the predator. I can see the world for what it really is. Too bad you can't or won't.”
Quebec Student Protests: Police Kettle, Arrest Hundreds (PHOTOS)

Quebec Student Protests: Police Kettle, Arrest Hundreds (PHOTOS)

Commented May 24, 2012 at 11:58:28 in Canada

“Any parent who brings their children to one of these, yes illegal, protests is potentially putting them in danger. That is simply irresponsible.”

sgillhoolley on May 24, 2012 at 13:47:43

“Protests don't need to be violent. The police are turning it violent. There are certainly a few protestors that are causing problems, and the police should certainly arrest anyone breaking laws (not counting Bill 78, that is clearly unconstitutional). That being said, the police are treating all protest as a crime, when it is a civic DUTY. That is what I said, not just a right, but a duty. If you see something that is wrong, it is your DUTY to let others know, to sound the alarm, as it were. Those not up to that challenge are to be pitied, but should not lead the retreat. That is why I write as much as I do on this site...I see it as my duty to spread the info to people. They can come to their own conclusions from there.”

aforbes808 on May 24, 2012 at 12:53:24

“You want to have a discussion about responsibility? Unlike our leaders both in government and business, they are living up to their responsibility. How about you?”
Quebec Student Protests: Police Kettle, Arrest Hundreds (PHOTOS)

Quebec Student Protests: Police Kettle, Arrest Hundreds (PHOTOS)

Commented May 24, 2012 at 11:52:05 in Canada

“Why would anyone bring their children to an illegal demonstration?”

sgillhoolley on May 24, 2012 at 13:43:32

“Illegal demonstration? What is that exactly?”

jimbo123 on May 24, 2012 at 12:10:33

“My god; how concrete can you get, stint?!”

aforbes808 on May 24, 2012 at 11:55:13

“Illegal? Students are our children, and our future. Wake up, that pride will bury you.”
huffingtonpost entry

The Canadian Charter of Shortcomings and Pitfalls

Commented Apr 21, 2012 at 11:53:59 in Canada

“It is an unusual argument to state "I disagree that the Charter trumps individual rights for group rights" and then immediately prove my point by arguing that minority groups "need protection." If these group "rights" truly need protecting, I would suggest that it would be preferable that such rights are accommodated as individual rights. Otherwise, the rights of the group will indeed trump those of the individual.

Quebec is an interesting case. Although the educational rights of the protestant minority were initially protected in the BNA Act, a subsequent constitutional amendment removed these protections with the establishment of linguistic school boards. That said, the linguistic rights of the English minority are seriously circumscribed. While I was able to secure a certificate of eligibility for my daughter to attend English schools, English speakers who move to the province from other countries do not have that right.

As to Diefenbaker, I believe there is insufficient recognition of his contribution to individual rights in Canada. Many of the other comments here confirm that impression. If we are going to cut out the middleman, why not just stop with the Magna Carta?”

Lower Canadian on Apr 21, 2012 at 12:46:06

“Minorities are often given special attention because it is a real possibility that their rights will be restricted and they will be discriminated against by the majority. Individuals in the majority still have substantive rights and I never intended for you to think that they didn't. You mentioned some minorities in your piece, so I was trying to explain to you why our Constitution protects minorities. However, you did not provide a specific example of a minority group's rights trumping those of individuals. If you had, I could have addressed it. But it is quite likely that you wouldn't need me to address it since you could simply go and read the judgment of the Supreme Court Justice deciding the matter. Those Justices are infinitely smarter than I am and would enlighten you more than I ever could.

People certainly do recognize the contributions of Diefenbaker to individual rights in Canada, including the Liberal Party. When the Conservatives downplay the contribution of Trudeau in the creation Charter, they are being intellectually dishonest and it is quite telling about what kind of a party they really are. Willing to revise history just to serve their visceral hatred of Trudeau.

And I agree, lets go all the way back to the Magna Carta then.”
huffingtonpost entry

The Canadian Charter of Shortcomings and Pitfalls

Commented Apr 21, 2012 at 00:13:41 in Canada

“tnanimation, I can only imagine your reaction if I had said the charter was not a real achievement. Did you bother to read the post before commenting?”
huffingtonpost entry

Surely Not in Canada Too?

Commented May 30, 2011 at 15:50:09 in Canada

“It's probably a little late now to respond to this, but it is very discouraging to see kkrisfalusi (aka @ipoliticseh) continue these unfounded attacks against me. Sure, I'm suspicious and I stated such in my tweets in late April. Yet, many of Carolyn Bennett's supporters did implicitly and directly point the finger at her adversary's campaign.

Significantly, no perpetrator has been caught to date. And the only real beneficiary of these attacks was Carolyn Bennett, with the sympathy generated helping her to hold her seat despite the Conservative wave.

Were the victims of these crimes merely cannon fodder in a larger battle? Who knows? Although I would not rule it out, it would be foolish to make the accusation that she did it to herself without evidence. I will, however, leave you with this shot (http://bit.ly/hAuPFe) of so-called graffitti painted on one of her supporter's house. IMHO, it simply does not look like the work of some furtive vandal.”
huffingtonpost entry

Canada's Pro-Democracy Movement

Commented Jan 31, 2010 at 17:57:51 in World

“This false outrage about prorogation is over the top.

War crimes? Really!

There is nothing stopping the opposition from forcing an election any time they want, except the fact that they know they would lose again if it came to a national vote.

If one is really worried about Canadian democracy (and there are some good reasons to be worried) then it would perhaps be better if the writer focused on our unelected Senate. Then, he might have some credibility. Otherwise, this is just a partisan rant.”