Adhd

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Spinning Fidget Toys Have Some ADHD Experts Reeling

For many individuals with ADHD, movement enhances focus. But the key to an effective fidget toy, whether it's squeezing a stress ball or peeling the label from a water bottle, is that engagement with the item happens largely without awareness, as focus lands elsewhere. With spinners, the focus seems to be landing on spinners, and that makes them distractions, not tools.
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I Just Did What I Swore I'd Never Do With My Child

What kind of mom drugs her kid? The mom who is tired of walking on eggshells, wondering who her child will hurt today. The mom who is tired of watching her baby suffer inside his own skin. The mom who, fighting back tears, dutifully takes the scrap of paper from the doctor with the round glasses.... What mom does that, anyway? The kind who will do whatever it takes to help her child feel better, even if it means doing precisely the thing she vowed never to do.
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ADHD Is Real (And Not A Result Of Bad Parenting)

To come across a neighbour or a friend questioning the validity of ADHD today is one thing. Coming across a teacher or a principal lacking knowledge about ADHD today is concerning. But to encounter an article in a prominent publication written by a therapist treating children with ADHD being shared on social media in today's day and age from a so-called expert that dumbs down the etiology of ADHD to a child's own "internal belief system" and the "pampering and coddling" of parents is more than insulting. It's dangerous.
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What Causes Mental Illness? It's Complicated.

I tell my patients, "Mental illnesses are medical illnesses, like diabetes or heart disease." Most of them struggle to believe me because they know that many people, even people who love them, think they can just "get over" their illnesses. And they're equally as hard on themselves. So let's talk about what causes mental illness, and why that question (and answer) are pretty complicated.
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Experts Say You Shouldn't Praise Children (But I Think The Experts Are Wrong)

Experts say you shouldn't praise children. I'm no psychologist, but I think they're wrong. Kids absolutely need to be praised. They deserve to be celebrated -- for the right reasons. I don't beat on to my son about how smart or handsome he is (though of course I'm biased on both counts). But when I know he has done something especially challenging, I don't skimp on the praise.
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ADHD Can Be a CEO's Secret Superpower

Bill Gates, Richard Branson, Jim Carrey, Howie Mandel -- all have ADHD. They have found ways to find complete order in their disorder. Once out of the structured school system, ADHD is not a disorder, but rather a beneficial trait in the working world. Perhaps this is why the creative CEOs we know and love today are so successful.
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If You Have a Child With Special Needs, You Can't Go it Alone

No kid comes with a guidebook. Kids with developmental disabilities of all kinds, both physical and neurological, are as diverse in thought, behaviour, strengths and weaknesses as their neuro-typical peers. With the added anxiety of raising very different children from what is expected, stress levels are higher, parenting is harder and divorce runs rampant among special needs parents. That is why it is so important for them to remain on the same side.
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How to Support Your Teen's Mental Health While at University

For parents with children away at university, it can be a giant leap of faith to step back and let their young adult children be independent, and know that they will be okay. Most young adults transition to university without difficulty and take charge of this new independent phase of their lives with motivation to do well and the skills to navigate their academic and social lives. But for some young adults, the stress of being on their own to manage the academic and social demands of university life may be a breaking point that heralds or worsens mental health issues, such as anxiety or depression.