Alberta Oilsands

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Is Justin Trudeau The Post-Fact Face Of Fascism?

Sure, I'll admit it. And, I'd also add that Justin doesn't have the kind of temperament as Trump, and Trudeau lacks the overt, brute power of the post-fact machinations of an American sized, propaganda machine. But be careful here. It's exactly that sort of reasoning that makes fascism so dangerous. Mesmerized by the most extreme perpetrators, we can then unconsciously ignore egregious abuses of democracy by more "normal," even cuddly-appearing leaders.

Clean Technology Is The Key To Meeting Climate Change Goals

Unfortunately, time is not on our side, and significantly reducing carbon emissions requires immediate action. I believe the time for cautious, incremental change has passed and that we must take bold steps to achieve our climate goals. Nowhere is bold action needed more than in the Canadian energy industry.
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It's Time to End Canada's Pipeline Circus

I have come to the conclusion that this decision is too important to leave in the hands of short-sighted federal, provincial and municipal politicians. Nor do I want to leave it to the oil industry or other lobbyist or environmental groups to decide. I want the ultimate decision to be made by the people of Canada, all the people, every single one.
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Alberta's Oilsands Workers Are Re-training For Renewable Energy

The workers and tradespeople who make up the oilsands sector have been hard hit by the recent oil slump. But a new group that is launching today is aiming to put oilsands workers back to work in the renewable energy sector and are calling on the Alberta government for support. Iron and Earth is a non-profit led by oilsands workers who want retrain 1000 electrical workers on 100 different solar projects.
Adrian Wyld/The Canadian Press

The Conservatives' Rhetoric On Pipelines Is A Blast From The Past

Rather than engaging in a robust post-election rebuilding process and seeking to broaden its base, the Conservative party has decided to retreat into their comfort zone of regional grievance politics. Under the leadership of Rona Ambrose, the Conservatives appear to be abandoning any attempt to repair the national coalition that swept them to power in 2006. Indeed, today they look more like the Canadian Alliance of the early 2000s than the governing Conservatives of the last 10 years. The latest and most obvious example of this is the party's recent opposition day motion on the Energy East pipeline.