Amazon

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Smart Shopping: How To Hunt For Discounts

Ever missed out on a deal so crazy-good that you couldn't stop thinking about it for days? If you're like the rest of us, then your answer is probably yes. Missing good deals is standard because good deals tend to happen all the time, while we are always somehow at the wrong place, at the wrong time. Luckily, there's a fixer for that and it's called taking control.
ASSOCIATED PRESS

Bye Bye, Staples?

FRAMINGHAM, Mass. - Staples will close up to 225 stores in the U.S. and Canada by the end of next year as it seeks to trim about $500 million in costs annually by 2015.The nation's largest office-supp...
AP

Would You Buy From a Kindle Vending Machine?

When last year's Consumer Electronics Show (CES) rolled into Las Vegas, many were surprised and intrigued by Amazon's presence. They didn't have a typical booth on the trade show floor. Instead, they set up a Kindle vending machine inside the Las Vegas airport (near the ATM and soda pop).

An Amazon Adventure: Puerto Misahualli, Ecuador

There was a twisty stick in the middle of my lane. It was after sunset and I couldn't see well, but as I passed the stick I realised it was alive! Tom was riding behind me, and the stick, not happy with my passing so close, reared up and went for Tom's leg.
ASSOCIATED PRESS

Amazon's Micro-Drones Are a Good Thing

The newly announced Amazon PrimeAir drone concept is essentially a mini-flying airplane that will deliver small purchases to your door in about half an hour. The commercialization of drones continues a micro-trend that is changing how we live and interact with the world around us for the better.
Getty

Why Work at a Tech Startup? Luring Vancouver's Tech Talent to the <i>real</i> Opportunities.

Startups often have to deal with one or all of three big issues: lack of capital, brand recognition and product penetration. While these are real threats and pose the biggest risk to success, startups often have advantages that cannot be found in large, established companies. Educating talent on these benefits helps them make an informed decision between the bright lights of the behemoth and the siren's call of the startup. So, what exactly are these benefits?

What I Learned This Week: How The Process Adds (Mega!) Value To The Product

The story and process behind a product is every bit as important as the product itself. The intangibility of what went into what you're buying gives it life, identity and value. Something purchased from Amazon isn't just "less expensive," but carries the entrepreneurial history of Jeff Bezos, the marvel of the company's state-of-the-art robotic selection and distribution system, and so on.
Newseum

Jeff Bezos Will Save the Washington Post

While the outcome is fairly obvious, the question is why did Bezos pay $250 million (he paid $500 million but $250 was its real estate) for the Washington Post? Why didn't he just start offering content deals to publishers and journalists then sell it on Amazon as he does now with movies?
Getty

Baby, You Can Track My Online Activity

Before you start lighting up those pitchforks and come after us marketers with a mix of mass hysteria and moral panic, take a look at your own online behavior and ask yourself, which scenario you prefer? Go to Amazon and start shopping (presuming you have been there before), and ask yourself, "what is the experience like?"
Shutterstock

This Tax Cheat Is Over

Tax arbitrage, or moving operations and tax liabilities to low-cost jurisdictions, has been a game played by rich people and multinationals for years. But the game is ending finally. This will have implications in terms of government revenues to pay for social services but will also have a negative impact on the profits and share prices of giants such as Google, Amazon and virtually every multinational that's a household name.
AP

It's Finally Coming To Canada

TORONTO - About a year and a half after the first model was released in the U.S., Amazon is finally bringing its Kindle Fire tablet to Canada.The company announced Thursday that it had begun taking pr...

The Problem With Allowing Consumers to Opt Out

As a marketing professional, there is nothing I hate more than receiving any form of communication (email, Web experience, social media, mobile, whatever) and not see an obvious place where I can either opt out of the communication or protect how much information is being captured. As a consumer, I probably hate it more.

The Next Media Gamechanger

The biggest heist in history was when newspapers and magazines allowed Google to "crawl" their content to readers, to pay nothing and to sell ads around their stories. Google became, in other words, the ubiquitous newspaper right under the noses of proprietors who should have charged.

What Comes After Smartphones?

What will Apple do next? What is the technology that will disrupt the iPhone and iPad business? If you have read Walter Isaacson's Steve Jobs biography (and I strongly recommend that you do), there was a very telling (and compelling) line from Jobs: "If you don't cannibalize yourself, someone else will."

Rather Than Buy Products, We Buy in to Services

It used to be that you bought a product, took it home, and used it until it ran out or broke. If you needed to, you bought another. Today, we don't just buy things, we buy into them. Two big trends have been reshaping the consumer marketplace: something-as-a-service and the experience economy.
Alamy

Watching the Watchdog: 50 Years of Journalism & It's all the Same

Once upon a time I wrote a book about being a journalist in the 21st century. I was leafing through its pages last evening, when I stopped at the chapter The Less Things Change... It's about my time, 50 years ago, working as reporter/anchor at a startup TV station in Zambia. The chapter starts by describing how we got our foreign news film back there in the 60s. Even after all these years, much is still the same.
Alamy

How E-Books Are Ruining the Next Generation of Writers

Literary writing is a worthless profession. Few who write novels, stories and poems make a living from them. This has been true for millennia. Lately the Internet has regressed into a society of feudal manors lorded over by tech giants like Amazon, Apple and Yahoo, who sell e-books for 99 cents or give them away for free. Their "competitive pricing" is threatening traditional publishers and physical books with extinction.
Shutterstock

Jobs That Can Be Done By Anyone Will Be Done By No One

Even though their prices have dropped, we still need commodities, products and services. And because these parts of the economy are so deeply entrenched, decades worth of innovation have focused on reducing cost - -this means automation. If it's cheaper to have systems or robots extract, refine, make, or deliver, it will be done -- no matter the industry.

The Social Web is a Golden Cage of Information

Do you actively seek out different opinions than your own, or unwittingly reinforce your personal conventional wisdom by only consuming "agreeable" content? While we may think it is the former, too often we live in a bubble. Here are some reasons why we're not as open-minded or as free as we may think, and how the internet is really preventing us from experiencing new things.
AP

E-Books -- Welcome to iCensorship

This app problem is just one skirmish in a long-brewing war between the ebook distributors. Consumers may not realize that ebook distributors have another weapon -- a dirty little secret actually -- to use in their fight: censorship. Yes, censorship.

The E-commerce Tipping Point

Recently, a very senior marketing professional who works at one of the world's largest corporations was recounting a story of how they saw a postal truck outside of their corporate head offices in Silicon Valley, and every single parcel that was being offloaded from this truck was from Amazon. He thought to himself: "This is the what retail looks like in 2012."