ATTAWAPISKAT STATE OF EMERGENCY

Getty

Book Excerpt: Children of the Broken Treaty

The state of emergency was declared on Oct. 28, 2011, by Attawapiskat's new chief, Theresa Spence. I had known her through her work on council. She didn't strike me as a firebrand or overly political. She was worried that, as the arctic winter descended on the community, people in these makeshift quarters could die. Days turned into weeks, and the temperature kept dropping. Officials from the regional office of Aboriginal Affairs spoke with the community about advancing some money to repair some of the condemned houses, but there was no offer to help get the families out of the tents and shacks.
CP

On the Anniversary of Attawapiskat, One Film Tells the Real Story

This week will mark the first anniversary since Attawawpiskat First Nation declared a state of emergency over the abysmal housing situation on the James Bay coast. Footage of the living conditions in this isolated community shocked Canadians and resulted in a media firestorm. The crisis became a cultural Pandora's box that unleashed numerous issues and misconceptions regarding our relationship with Canada's First Peoples. Now on the eve of this dark anniversary, Canada's "Katrina" moment has made it to the big screen. And who better equipped to tell the real story of the 2011-housing crisis than iconic filmmaker Alanis Obamsawin?
Charlie Angus

New Hope In Attawapiskat

TIMMINS, Ont. - A solution to some of the most immediate problems in Attawapiskat seems to be taking shape.Regional Grand Chief Stan Louttit says five families living in tents on the Northern Ontario...