Breast Cancer Awareness Month

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Advice From A Breast Cancer Survivor: Check Your Breasts

My soapy hand grazed over the underside of my left breast and there it was. The dreaded lump. And it was big -- just a wee bit smaller than a golf ball. How the hell did I not notice that before? I poked and prodded at it as if that would make it go away. I swallowed my panic. It can't be cancer, I told myself. It's just a cyst. It's fine. I just had a clear mammogram four months earlier for God's sake.
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A Breast Cancer Story: How Losing My Hair Changed Me Forever

Hair loss is such a personal thing, yet it's so public when it's yours. Many women hide it because it's a visible reminder of the pain they're in. We are fighting for our lives, so why should something so superficial mean so much? Because our hair makes us feel like ourselves -- strong and pretty and whole -- and when we lose it, we feel weak and vulnerable.
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This October, Let's Stop Pinkwashing Breast Cancer

Despite the lovely pink ribbon, toxic ingredients are polluting us. Maybe it's just the cynic in me, but I think it should be common sense that we can't shop our way to a cure -- especially by listening to companies who claim to be supporting us and fighting breast cancer, while selling products that can contribute to causing the very disease.
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Helping Kids Cope During Breast Cancer Awareness Month

Caregivers do their best to guide parents as they struggle to talk with their children about cancer, but misunderstanding, denial, and apprehension often distort the communication process. Frustration and fear can build up as parents respond to their child's curiosity with hesitation. Parents must provide appropriate information about cancer to gain the confidence they need to do the best they can for their child.
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10 Ways to Help a Friend With Cancer

I was diagnosed with breast cancer at 37 when my children were two, three and six. Some of us knew how to support a mother or grandmother through this disease -- but a friend? Now, I often get calls and emails from friends who are at a loss when another friend has been diagnosed. What can they do to help? Here is a list of things that friends did for me -- or things that I heard of people doing for friends with breast cancer.
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Breast Cancer Awareness at Any Age

It's easy to overlook all sorts of things when we're young. We are strong, supple and invincible. But even at a young age, we need to be mindful that time can fly. Suddenly it's more important to have a family doctor and talk turns to what medical tests you need.