Budgeting

Lea Roth via Getty Images

The Cash-strapped Guide To Charity Giving

Even though I have more than I need, I struggle with making space in my budget for helping the most vulnerable. Maybe you're experiencing similar budget issues. I know from talking to friends that many of them are in the same boat, so I did a little brainstorming. How can we help others when our own purse strings are stretched thin?
Pgiam via Getty Images

What To Do With Your Tax Refund

When a refund is granted, keep in mind that this money was yours to begin with, not a gift from the government. Nonetheless, it's still great to receive those additional funds. Now that you have that extra cash on hand, let's look at ways to maximize your tax refund and get it working for you.
kieferpix via Getty Images

You Weren't Born To Pay Off Debt And Die

What you don't have to do forever is live with debt. You don't have to spend every month calculating how much you can afford to put towards debt repayment, while continuing to use credit, and staying in the never-ending cycle of borrowing money and trying to pay it back. It's not an easy cycle to get out of; I know that firsthand.
Rawpixel Ltd via Getty Images

How To Give Your Budget A March Break

March Break is just around the corner, and if you're like many Canadians, you're probably wondering how you're going to afford to pay for it. Luckily, there's an easy way to save money, keep your children happy, and teach them a few life lessons too. Use the break as an opportunity to put your kids in the classroom of life by involving them in the March Break budgeting process. Here's how:
Shutterstock

Save for a Rainy Day With an Emergency Fund

From repairing a leaky roof to replacing a car engine, these unexpected costs can add up fast. But more important than unexpected costs, an emergency fund is your safeguard against a sudden loss of income. That's why financial experts stress the importance of having an emergency fund.
Wavebreakmedia Ltd via Getty Images

Supporting Your Child's Education Goes Way Beyond Starting an RESP

When I became a parent 15 years ago, I knew it was important to save for my daughter's education. While our income didn't allow for large RESP contributions, we made regular ones, supplemented by money she received, often as gifts, along the way. But with my daughter a mere three years away from post-secondary school, I've learned that my role as a parent extends well beyond helping her finance an education.
SimmiSimons via Getty Images

Disability and Debt: When One Happens to Canadians, the Other Follows

Many Canadians are well aware that a disability could occur at any time. Ninety-six per cent of us believe it, according to a recent RBC survey. The same survey showed that more than three-quarters of us also believe that missing three months of work, due to disability, would put us in serious financial jeopardy. Here are some steps you can take to prepare yourself for a possible disability.
Thomas Barwick via Getty Images

Ways for New Graduates to Save

Graduating students have high debts and the chance of finding a good paying job appears to be low, according to the leading pundits. This may all seem very daunting if you're a grad with two or three part-time jobs who's barely scraping enough together for rent. Here are some suggestions on how you can achieve these goals with careful planning and creativity.