Cable Tv

shutterstock

Will Netflix and YouTube Kill TV?

The real question people are starting to ask: why pay for a lot of channels with so many commercials? CBC, which is now mostly funded by taxpayers, and any other network with a business model that can eliminate or at least reduce ads, can flourish in this new environment. That is, by giving viewers what they really want, programs, not commercials.
Tommaso Boddi via Getty Images

HBO And CBS Just Killed Cable TV

CBS and HBO's move to streaming highlights a new reality that's hard for many telecom execs to accept: That the one thing we don't need in television's digital future is cable TV. How the big telecoms react to the coming obsolescence of cable TV will play a large role in shaping the future of Canada's entertainment industry. Let's hope they don't keep us stuck in the channel-flipping past for too long.

Could the Cable T.V. Model Save Online News?

The newspaper industry has yet to come to terms with the Internet. With decreasing circulation figures and declining ad revenues, daily papers haven't figured out how to turn a profit from their online readership. There have been numerous attempts at getting online users to pay, few of which have worked.
Alamy

The Week in Review: Can CanCon Rules Survive Netflix?

This week, we learned that about one in five Canadian television subscribers has said goodbye to cable or satellite contracts and opted to get his TV fix from streaming and over-the-air sources instead. This makes me wonder about the future of Canadian content rules. Mandating the percentage of CanCon that gets aired works in the cable monopoly model, but it's a tough feat when consumers are selecting and purchasing what they will watch on an individual show-by-show basis. Government's attempts at force-feeding viewers particular categories of pedigreed entertainment are going to become a losing proposition.