Copyright

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Liberal Copyright Reform May Nix Canadian Access To U.S. Netflix

The prospect of considering expanded blocking for copyright purposes validates the fears of civil liberties groups that the introduction of blocking requirements invariably expands to cover a wider net of content. Canadian copyright was already on track for a boisterous debate in the coming years with changes such as copyright term extension mandated by the Trans Pacific Partnership and a review of the law scheduled for 2017. If government officials envision adding VPN usage, access to U.S. Netflix and website blocking to the list of issues, copyright could emerge as one of the government's most difficult and controversial issues.
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Modern Copyright Extremism Will Kill Creativity As We Know it

Music, much like all art and cultural productions, thrives because musicians are constantly borrowing, sharing, and reacting. Slap a copyright on a chord progression, melody, riff, or a tone and watch the endless variety, one of the most beloved qualities of music and the 21st Century, wither. That's why we're fighting back against TPP copyright extremism.
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Copyright Trolls Are Making it Rain Infringement Notices All Over Canadians

The threats of hundred-thousand dollar fines and getting booted off of the Internet came on the heels of a new law requiring ISPs to pass copyright infringement notices on to their subscribers. The ISP are now legally obliged to comply, forwarding the notices along to alleged infringers verbatim and, as it now turns out, without much attention to whether the content owners were even accusing the right person.
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Can the Law Prosecute Users of The Pirate Bay Without Invading Innocents' Privacy?

The Pirate Bay is a popular website for the BitTorrent downloading of music, movies, games, software and much more. Swedish police raided the site by seizing its servers in Stockholm, allegedly in connection with violation of copyright law. The Pirate Bay shutdown isn't the first and likely won't be the last of its kind. Law enforcement agencies have been raiding the Pirate Bay service since 2006. The key challenge to pursuing consumers who share and download content in violation of copyrights is identifying them. Proposed solutions to this challenge pose serious privacy law concerns.
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Broadcasters Should Not Censor Political Ads

Political speech is seemingly under attack from the last place we might expect: Canadian media broadcasters, that say parties can't use broadcasters' content in ads. Protecting copyright is not an illegitimate purpose, but this approach is less than ideal for political advertisements. Political parties rely on election advertising to persuade the electorate to vote for them. This political expression is a significantly important aspect of public discourse and should be accorded the highest priority and protection.
PA

Internet Freedom: How Canadians Are Kept in the Dark

Here at OpenMedia.ca, we've already been hearing from Canadians outraged that our own Members of Parliament are still being denied access to the TPP text -- access that has now been granted to their counterparts in Washington D.C. We know that Canadians will not accept their Members of Parliament being kept in the dark
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Canada's Copyright Board Is Badly Broken

The litany of complaints about the Copyright Board of Canada has mounted in recent years: The public rarely participates in its activities due to high costs, it moves painfully slowly, and its rules encourage copyright collectives and users to establish extreme positions that make market-driven settlements more difficult.
WikiMedia:

Is This Canadian Newspaper Breaking Copyright Law?

If someone wants to post a quote from anything written by the National Post, they are now presented with pop-up box seeking a licence that starts at $150 for the Internet posting of 100 words with an extra fee of 50 cents for each additional word (the price is cut in half for non-profits). None of this requires a licence or payment. If there was a fair dealing analysis, there is no doubt that copying a hundred words out of an article would easily meet the fair dealing standard. In fact, the Supreme Court of Canada has indicated that copying full articles in some circumstances may be permitted.
CP

Citizens of the Internet Aren't Going Down Without a Fight

As the 15th round of Trans-Pacific Partnership negotiations draw to a close, the Internet freedom community is taking stock of what was said, and perhaps more significantly, what wasn't. Developments over the last few weeks suggest that the controversial treaty may be losing steam as public opposition gains momentum. The public outcry is starting to show the cracks in the push to criminalize our Internet use.

The Canada-EU Trade Agreement Leak

As International Trade Minister Ed Fast returns from negotiations in Europe that failed to secure a deal on the Canada-EU Trade Agreement, newly leaked documents to the CAQ and posted by LaPresse provide a detailed look at the remaining outstanding issues with details on the Canadian and European positions.
CP

Canada - EU Trade Negotiations Clouded by ACTA Concerns

The Canada - EU Trade Agreement negotiations continue this week in Brussels with both parties hoping to wrap up many outstanding issues. According to information provided by Canadian officials at a briefing earlier next month, the plan is to narrow the areas of disagreement to no more than ten issues, with ministers meeting in Europe in November to try to forge an agreement on the contentious areas.