Food Security

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Food Alone Won't Solve Hunger

For the last 40 years, we've been sold a lie about how to solve hunger. It's the kind of deception that sounds so right, so convincing, that we don't even ask questions. We've been told that handing out food to poor, struggling people will fill their need and end their hunger. And yet nothing could be further from the truth.
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Imagine A Farming Industry That Grows Food, Not Corporate Profit

Nyeleni (global congress for food sovereignty) produced The Declaration of the International Forum for Agroecology. It advocated a model of food production radically opposed to the current corporate-controlled system. The declaration represents a challenge to transnational agribusiness. Rather than wanting to transform society and food and agriculture, these state-corporate interests require business as usual.
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Stop Trying To Solve Hunger With Corporate Food Waste

It seems like a marriage made in heaven. Eliminate the vast amount of food waste in our society by giving it to the poor and hungry. No more hunger. No more waste. At least that's what advocates for food-waste-to-the-poor schemes will have us believe. Here at home, MP Ruth-Ellen Brosseau's private member's bill, C-231, Fight Against Food Waste Act, will continue being debated in the House of Commons in the coming weeks. But this is a relationship doomed before it even begins.
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A Soda Tax Will Only Hurt The People It's Meant To Help

There has been increasing interest in the use of a sugar-sweetened beverage tax to curb the burden of obesity in Canada -- call it a 'pop tax' if you like. A recent Senate report on obesity in Canada recommends assessing the possibility of a sugar-sweetened beverage tax and points to the high rates of taxation on tobacco products as a successful example worth imitating. But have taxes on tobacco products been as successful as is often claimed?
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What Happens When The Safety Net Fails?

As a society, we established a system of social welfare programs because we wanted to take better care of each other and ensure that everyone had access to basic needs, even during hard times. It was an effort to get a little bit closer to that perfect world. On Monday, a new report was released by the Canadian Centre for Policy Alternatives that demonstrates the gap between where we currently are and our vision of where we'd like to be.
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Northern Hunger Won't Disappear With The Snow

In the territories, nearly one in five households has trouble getting enough food to eat. In Nunavut, this figure rises to half of all households -- a truly staggering number. This situation is the result of many factors, including the high cost of food and very high rates of poverty, particularly within indigenous communities. The effects of the residential school trauma, decreasing access to traditional foods, and the high cost of hunting add complexity to the problem.
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How We Can Really Bring An End To World Hunger

Sustainable Development Goal number two is focused specifically to insure that hunger is nonexistent in our world by 2030. The mission, is to "End hunger, achieve food security and improved nutrition and promote sustainable agriculture."This seems like something that's impossible to achieve, but again, considering the amount of food that is constantly present on the shelves of grocery stores, clearly, this is achievable. Hence, it's not an issue of food available, but instead, one with regards to proper food distribution.
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Basic Income Is Just What the Doctor Ordered

What makes people sick? Infectious agents like bacteria and viruses and personal factors like smoking, eating poorly and living a sedentary lifestyle. But none of these compares to the way that poverty makes us sick. Prescribing medications and lifestyle changes for our patients who suffer from income deficiency isn't enough; we need to start prescribing healthy incomes. The upstream factors that affect health -- such as income, education, employment, housing, and food security -- have a far greater impact on whether we will be ill or well. Of these, income has the most powerful influence, as it shapes access to the other health determinants.