GREAT LAKES

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Canada, Get Ready To Feel The Bite Of Climate Change

"If climate change is a shark, then water is its teeth." Like a fish that doesn't notice the shark until it feels its sharp bite, humans will first feel the effects of climate change through water. Under current projections, most freshwater ecosystems globally will face ecologically significant impacts by the middle of this century.
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The Trouble With This Winter's Unfrozen Great Lakes

Conservation scientists are concerned about the lack of ice on the Great Lakes, which this winter is at an almost historic low. Young fish may face harsher environments; shoreline habitats are in jeopardy; the risks of pollution are elevated; and algae problems could be worse than usual this summer as a result, leading to an increased number of beach closings.
ASSOCIATED PRESS

How to Tackle Lake Erie's Algae Problem

Phosphorus is a key nutrient in aquatic systems, but excess phosphorous is the leading cause of the increase in the harmful blue-green algae that is becoming more common in the Great Lakes. Toxic and harmful algal bloom occurrences in Lake Erie pose risks to drinking supplies, quality of life and economic vitality.

Asian Carp Found Near Lake Ontario

Without question, the Asian carp poses a significant threat to the health of the Great Lakes watershed. This highlights the importance of effective invasive species prevention programs and bi-national collaboration to ensure that the Asian carp and other non-native species don't make their way into these waters.
watershed

Canadians Need to Become True Freshwater Stewards

Canadians are natural water stewards. As keepers of one fifth of the world's freshwater, we have a responsibility to protect it, but where to begin? We at WWF decided to start by filling a major knowledge gap: Canada currently does not have a complete picture of the state of its watersheds.
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We're Finally Taking Steps to Improve Lake Erie's Water Quality

Ontario and the states of Ohio and Michigan have reached an agreement to reduce the amount of phosphorous entering the western basin of Lake Erie by 40 per cent. Phosphorous is a key nutrient in water, but when present at high concentrations can lead to harmful algal blooms which can impact water quality, ecosystem health, fisheries, tourism and property values.