Hackers

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Hooking Up With Leadership Lessons From Ashley Madison

It is generally assumed that aversion to risk is one of the biggest obstacles to Canadian innovation, but only 10 per cent of Canadian businesses are truly risk averse. The big issue is apparently an inability to align risk-taking with financial capacity -- rational risk-taking obviously involves being able to survive the potential negative consequences of your actions. And that's a key lesson buried in the aftermath of the hacker attack on the controversial Ashley Madison online affair service.
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Why We Should Sympathize With the Exposed Ashley Madison Users

Let's be clear -- no one who signed up for Ashley Madison has committed a crime or participated in illegal activity. Shouldn't we be channelling our outrage towards a group of hackers for taking it upon themselves to determine what's immoral and what's appropriate conduct on the Internet? Using cyber-terrorism as a tool to shame people who may not navigate by the same moral compass as you is not only the ultimate breach in privacy; it's an attack on net neutrality. Imposing fear on people for how they behave online is just as repressive as restricting certain behaviours and content in the first place.