HEALTH TRANSFER

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Looking At The Changing World Of The Canada Health Transfer

The Harper era saw the move to a full per capita funding formula without a tax-point equalizing adjustment in 2014-15 -- basically a top-down policy change. Prime Minister Harper did continue with the 6 per cent annual escalator, which was part of the original 2004 Health Accord. But he also unilaterally decided to end the escalator in 2017-18 and replace it with increases tied to the growth rate of GDP and subject to a floor of 3 per cent.
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Harper's Solution to Health Care Woes? Disappear

On November 22 and 23, Canada's premiers are holding an economic summit in Halifax. Stephen Harper was invited, but he's not coming. Harper's quiet absence at the first ministers' meeting in Halifax speaks volumes about his commitment to universal health care. Harper is well aware that his refusal to negotiate a 2014 Health Accord and the downloading of almost $40 billion will encourage provinces to charge patients out-of-pocket and bring in more for-profit services. This is the most expensive and least efficient method of delivering health care -- if you need proof, just look to our southern neighbours.
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Poverty: A Huge Cost to Our Health-care System

Poverty and health go hand-in-hand. People in poverty are more likely to use the health care system because of physical and mental health issues or illness, and be more likely to face an early death. Stress, poor nutrition, inadequate housing, and unstable social environments are a few reasons for this.

Time for Ottawa to Change Course on Health Care

Ottawa likes to claim credit for supporting Medicare, but is quick to note that responsibility lies with the provinces. The provinces like to assert their jurisdiction over health care but never hesitate to point to "inadequate funding" from Ottawa to explain away failures. Can we get beyond this?