Island Bouvet

Scaling A Mountain on Earth's Most Remote Island

Bouvetoya is only 774 metres high, but it is not well mapped, so one of the challenges is the element of the unknown. It's hard to conserve your energy when you don't know what's ahead. It was a seven kilometre walk up a steady hill, and we weren't halfway there that my legs started giving in under the weight of my pack.

Staring Down Penguins on South Georgia Island

These were cute at first, but soon we realized that their behaviour was closer to that of wild dogs than cute penguins. They would bark, clumsily coming towards us as if to bite our ankles. It was a bit scary, frankly, but the only way to keep them at bay would be to bark back, and go towards them showing our superior size.
AP

Venturing to the Most Remote Place on Earth

We'll be travelling from a cape in South America to Africa, stopping at Bouvet Island, where fewer people have been to than the moon. Both capes represent the toughest seas on Earth, but for me it's much more than that. It's completing the loop from the end of human exploration to the beginning of civilization.