John Tory

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John Tory Will Say Anything To Finally Win

Mr. Ford and Mr. Tory share something else. Neither wants to work to the plan we have, preferring instead to draw new lines on maps. It's never easy to decipher what, precisely, Mr. Tory believes today, but it seems he no longer supports the Sheppard or Finch LRT's. And he certainly no longer supports the subway relief line that is the TTC's top priority, which is odd because getting it built allegedly propelled him to run.
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So You Want to Be Toronto's Mayor? What's Your Transit Plan?

While the leading candidates for Toronto's mayoral elections -- Olivia Chow, David Soknacki, Karen Stintz, and John Tory -- were unanimous in realizing that mobility was the number one issue for the City. The transit plans they revealed had one thing in common: they only have partial solutions and pet projects for Toronto's mobility troubles.
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John Tory's Massive Flip-Flop Proves He's Not Mayoral Material

Remember when John Tory's top priority was a subway relief line? He was so keen about building the Yonge Street Relief Line. So very keen, he often sounded like Rob Ford, demonizing Olivia for wanting a mix of above- and below-ground rail. Irrespective of expert advice, he vowed to start "immediately," because it's "job one." Ah, the clarity of yesterday, as printed in the Toronto Star on April 4: "I said at my [campaign] launch I would make the Yonge Street Relief Line priority number one. And I meant it." Not so. Now there's a new priority and faster than you can say Eurasia was never at war with Oceania, yesterday's priority is gone. Poof.
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The Show Goes On Without Ford

A roundtable discussion took place at city hall on Monday night involving nine people seeking to be the next mayor of Toronto. Each of the participants was given five minutes at the start of the round...
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Ford Is Rapidly Taking Over Chow Country

I thought former Trinity NDP MP Olivia Chow, would be a formidable challenger to Mayor Rob Ford. But I am starting to have my doubts, as the glow of the brief honeymoon with Chow has dissipated. And Olivia Chow is faltering and fading. Chow's agenda recalls an earlier more left-wing extremist period in Toronto politics. Since the first debate, the indications are even stronger that Ford is cutting into Chow Country. The reasons are obvious.
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Focus More On Electing Your Councillor and Less On Your Mayor

This is why council is so important. As a unified body it has immense power to shift the agenda of our city. A mayor should technically be able to unite and determine solid goals for Toronto along with a strong policy agenda designed to solve our toughest of challenges. Unfortunately there hasn't been much unity on council and partisan-politics has stifled much progress. The never ending subway vs. LRT debate creating a rift between the downtown core and the suburbs and a lack of true 'big-picture, visionary thinking' has seriously stalled Toronto's ability to capitalize on its unique potential.
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If the Other Candidates Don't Step it Up, We're in For Ford More Years

If Rob Ford's opponents don't step up their game, there is a very real chance Rob Ford will be re-elected Mayor of Toronto in October 2014, providing he continues to meet the requirements to be a candidate for Mayor. Wednesday night's debate hosted by CityTV was an absolute farce. It was not a good night for Torontonians ready for change at City Hall. Very little by way of policy was discussed, and even when it was, there is enough agreement between the Mayor's opponents on key issues that polarizing this election in a manner that favours a challenger will be hard.
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Ford Grins His Way Through 1st Debate

TORONTO - Rob Ford came frequently under attack Thursday during the first televised mayoral debate, but none of the main candidates vying for his job mentioned the so-called "crack" video or other sca...
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Move Over Rob Ford: How I'd Restore Civility in City Hall

As mayor, I will move to adopt ranked ballots, a model that would help to unite our divided city by rewarding candidates with a broad appeal within the electorate. Too much of our current political discourse is spent on negativity, or pitting councillors against one another. Ranked ballots would help eliminate this rancor, fostering a more positive political environment. Ever wonder why political parties choose leaders this way? It's because ranked ballots help maintain a certain level of civility that has been AWOL from Toronto politics for quite some time.
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Something's Fishy About John Tory's Mayoral Campaign

According to a recent Globe and Mail article, Andy Pringle, a member of the Toronto Police Services Board (TPSB) has decided to recuse himself from any discussions of the Fords at the board. It raises further questions about Tory's relationship with Pringle both prior to and during this contentious mayoral campaign. It started with a fishing trip...
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Why Fiscally Responsible Torontonians Won't Vote For John Tory

Tory's best hope for victory is that he must go after Chow's downtown support immediately. Let me throw another log on the fire. My thesis is not only that the right has abandoned Tory, and will not vote for him in significant numbers, but that Tory has actively shifted left to go after mushy Liberal support. In other words, John Tory, in the first days of his campaign, has revealed himself to be, what many of us true fiscal conservatives, have long suspected: that John Tory is a mushy downtown Liberal elitist in Tory clothing.
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John Tory's Views on the Wage Gap Are Half Right

Instead of dismissing his comments as sexist, perhaps we should be thanking Mr. Tory for raising the subject. The wage gap remains a complex and multifaceted issue that needs thoughtful discussion. If we can open a healthy debate on the topic, we stand a better chance of tackling it properly.