Marketing

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When The Going Gets Tough, The Tough Build Trust

It's a common experience among many communications professionals: after helping an organization build its brand reputation during good times, we often see our efforts unravel the moment an economic downturn hits and senior management decides to cut spending on brand communications. It's understandable. But it's also a mistake, since difficult times are exactly when an organization should remain visible and emphasize its brand.
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This is Why Retailers Must Invest In NFC Technology

For chain retailers, NFC can also be used to download information about product availability. If one store is out of stock, then it can provide a list of other stores within the vicinity that has the item in inventory. This increases the likelihood of customers immediately going to the same retailer in another location rather than potentially shopping at a competing store for the same product.
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3 Reasons To Make Friends With Your Business Competition

Being friendly doesn't mean sharing every secret or disregarding competition. After all -- you're both after customers in a crowded marketplace. Just realize that strategically aligning with the competition can make your business better. McDonald's needs Burger King; FedEx keeps UPS on its toes. Healthy business rivalries help stave off complacency and will make your company stronger in the long run.
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Millennials Need Credit (But Don't Have It)

Stats show that millennials prefer to use debit cards to credit cards for their purchases. Millennials are the first generation to grow up with debit cards, which may explain this pattern. Several findings prove that this generation isn't fond of credit products. The reasons for this may be many, but the top may be controlling spending and fear of debt. This lack and hesitance to use a credit card among millennials is causing them more harm than good in the long run.
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Why Digital Music Platforms Are Failing

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When Apple Music, Spotify and Tidal launched, they were hailed as digital prophets that promised new ways to monetize the experience. Thus far, their solutions have fallen short of fireworks. Just slightly over a quarter of Spotify's 75 million active users actually pay for the service. And, as The Guardian UK reports, despite pulling in €1.08 bn in revenue, its losses were €162.3m. So why are all these promising platforms sinking?
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The Blurred Line Between Advertorial And Editorial

There used be a great divide between the advertising and editorial departments of media outlets; they operated in separate silos and never the twain shall meet. But those days are gone. At the end of the day, the media is a business -- and it's a tough business. Revenues are drying up, falling year after year. It makes good business sense to leverage earned media opportunities with a paid advertising buy.