Ontario

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Stop Using Minimum Wage To Determine Who Is Beneath You

Our grandparents believed a person wasn't their job. They didn't live to work. They wanted a work day that ended on time and a job they didn't take home with them. Now we thumb our noses at the people we depend upon every day, as if they somehow are beneath us because of the jobs we need them to do. We talk about how these are jobs for teenagers, despite the fact that -- much like older people did these jobs 50 years ago -- the average age of a fast food worker is 29. We now act as if not having the highest ambition is somehow deserving of poverty.
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Hoskins And Bell Need To Support Family Medicine

I can see that we are once again heading for the same situation as the late 1990s/early 2000s, when many medical trainees stopped going into comprehensive family medicine. The reasons then were due to increased workload, better opportunities in other specialties and an extremely poor relationship with the government of the day. To suggest that there was a crisis in family medicine would be dramatically understating the issue.
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Canada Must Follow Ontario's Pharmacare Example

Ontario has been the site of dueling pharmacare proposals and Canadians are the victors. At the end of April, the opposition NDP promised universal drug coverage for a list of essential medicines. Not to be outdone, the ruling Liberal party announced universal coverage for all drugs on the provincial formulary for youth under 25 years of age. Most health policy experts praised both proposals, myself included.
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Ontario's War On Pain Patients

Health Quality Ontario just released a report on opioid use that will do nothing but frighten many doctors into refusing to properly medicate their pain patients. Doctors and dentists prescribe these drugs for post surgical or dental pain; acute pain as the result of a broken bone or other painful trauma; palliative care for terminal cancer; and for chronic pain.
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4 Reasons Canada Needs Universal Pharmacare Now

Several national commissions on Canada's health care system have recommended adding prescription drugs to our publicly funded universal medicare system. No federal government has ever acted on those recommendations. Not yet, anyhow. By creating 'pharmacare-junior,' Premier Wynne and Minister Hoskins are in essence calling on the federal government to help finish the job and create a pharmacare program for all Canadians of all ages.