Overdose

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People Will Die From Cannabis Dispensary Raids

Two major studies in the US have found that the states which have cannabis dispensaries have much lower rates of opioid use and deaths. This makes sense, because cannabis is often used as a pain reliever, just like opioids are. When people have easy access to a safer pain-reliever, cannabis, they are less likely to use the more risky one, opioids.
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Why Do So Many Canadian Prisoners Die After Their Release?

Canadians might be surprised to learn that many health and social services widely available in the community are not available in most of Canada's correctional facilities -- this needs to change. We are missing a critical window of opportunity to reframe the period of incarceration as a time to help people improve their health and well-being before returning to our communities.
Joelle Tomlinson

Fentanyl Stole My Brother From Our Family

Fentanyl stole from me, from my family and from countless others across Canada. I've had items stolen from me before. In high school, someone broke into my locker and took my iPod. I remember my mom telling me, "Life goes on." Last year, someone stole funds from my bank account. Life goes on. Sometimes, though, it doesn't. On February 28, 2015, my older brother took what he thought was an Oxycontin tablet while he was out partying. He went home, he went to bed and he never woke up.
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Canada's Opioid Crisis Is Fuelled By Doctors

he false notion that opioids are safe, effective treatments for chronic pain was inculcated by the companies that manufacture them, with self-styled "experts" preaching this gospel to front-line physicians. Incredibly, this happened in the absence of good evidence that the benefits of long-term opioid use outweigh the risks.
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Canada Should Put Restrictions on Acetaminophen

Acetaminophen (Tylenol, Tempra, Anacin) is the top-selling over-the-counter painkiller, available without prescription since the 1950s, yet there have long been serious questions about its safety. Canada and the United States do have warning labels saying the stuff is hard on your liver, but the Canadian ones don't exactly jump out at you, often buried deep in the fine print. Meanwhile, sountries like France and Germany, New Zealand and the United Kingdom, have even begun restricting where you can buy acetaminophen.