Police Brutality

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Leaders Mourn Mandela But Miss His Message

Rolihlahla "Nelson" Mandela is a global icon. His legendary ascension from prisoner to President is the stuff of fairytales. In this time of international mourning, our leaders should wipe their crocodile tears and reflect upon their actions, or lack thereof, in fulfilling the promise of racial equality which Nelson Mandela stood for. Mandela may no longer be with us, but his legacy, his message and his estimable struggle live on. They reside inside all of us who acknowledge that the pursuit of integration and equity belongs not in the apartheid past in a foreign land but in the bosom of our beloved nation.
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Having Police Shoot the Mentally Ill is Cost Effective But Absurd

When someone is severely troubled, delusional, and potentially violent and we have no beds for them in our hospitals, they may get to deal with the police who are likely to shoot them. Not exactly a humanitarian way of dealing with the seriously mentally ill but one that is likely cost effective. We are not providing appropriate care and resources to the seriously mentally ill and we need to.
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Watching the Watchdog: What Keeping an Eye on Cops Can Do

You can't watch the police riot at the G20 summit or the killing of Sammy Yatim in the bus on all those smartphones and surveillance cameras without believing that maybe, just maybe, the era of the thin blue line endlessly protecting its own might be ending. Not because the cops have cleaned up their act. But because now they're being watched.
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What Will It Take To End Police Violence?

Racialized working-class communities, individuals and Indigenous peoples in North America know the daily reality of police violence and containment. We do not need the intervention of civil liberties organizations, critical criminology courses or the exposure of police violence at a G20 Summit to know that police are not protecting us.
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When Videos of Police Brutality Are Not Enough, Citizens Must Act

The proliferation of cellphone cameras is increasingly catching those meant to serve and protect us in acts of violence and brutality against us. But catching the police red-handed has not stopped police abuse of power. Videos, law suits, inquests, inquiries and public outcries -- none of these seem to have shaken the intractable police conviction that some civilians deserve to be beaten by the police, and that the police can act with impunity. Police culture CAN change. It is not intractable. But it will only change through the political power of engaged citizens.

The B.C. Election: The Pitfalls of Flip-Flopping

Here Warren Kinsella's oft-repeated maxim rings true. In Kinsella's latest book he states that what is true of car crashes is true of political life. When polled, voters will insist they hate negative ads. But when they thinking no one is looking they will slow down, take a look, and remember what they see.

Has Politeness Become Passé?

I remember meeting an executive at a corporate reception a couple of years ago who was bemoaning the fact that he's just too busy to deal with what he called "the niceties" of peer-to-peer communication. According to him, there just aren't enough hours in the day to swap insignificant comments of courtesy. When he said, "I wish people would just get to the point" it struck such a chord in me that I Tweeted about it, suggesting that maybe he's missing the point:
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Victoria Police Brutality Ruling

VICTORIA - An adjudicator has ruled a Victoria police officer used excessive force during an arrest three years ago.The circumstances of the March 2010 arrest prompted public outrage when a witness po...
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Man Allegedly Beaten By RCMP

A municipal police force has been called in to investigate the alleged beating of a man by two RCMP officers in southeast B.C. Investigators from Delta will be looking into the incident in Creston, B...