QUEBEC CHARTER

Did the Ethnic Vote Crush Pauline Marois?

Was the rise in voter turnout linked to an increase of immigrant and visible minorities voters? Was it the Charter or the spectre of another referendum for them to "steal" that drove them to the polls in record numbers? If Premier Marois had access to better polling data surveying minorities who make up a sizeable chuck of the electorate, would she have pulled the electoral chain to begin with? As pollsters drown in the sea of complacency and/or mortal fear of uncovering the uncomfortable truths, the necessary examination of voters will continue to falter.
CP

The PQ's Values Charter Suffers a Succession of Disapproval

Quebec's Human Rights Commission has taken the highly unusual step of commenting on a government proposal, delivering one of the most forceful rebukes yet to the Parti Québécois' Charter of Quebec Values. According to the Commission, the values charter would represent "a clear break" with Quebec's Charter of Human Rights and Freedoms.
Getty

Education Can Solve Quebec's Language Debate

The PQ should focus on using education to preserve its culture and language. Almost 80 per cent of Quebecers identify themselves as Francophone. Thus, it's a failure of education when someone who was born, raised and educated in Montreal tells you that he moved to Toronto because it's impossible to find a job in Montreal. The issue should not be that French was required of them but that, over the course of their educational career, they were not properly taught the language and its value -- economic and cultural. The new Ontarians will not phrase it this way, of course.
CBC

Thank Q! Culture in Defence of Montreal

Last Thursday night about 1,500 Montrealers gathered for an event that coincided with Pop Montreal. When the CBC's Jian Ghomeshi brought his crew to the Olympia Theatre for a live taping of his daily radio show, Q, the Toronto-based host, perhaps unwittingly, used culture to choreograph and direct a re-awakening of the city's confidence.
Getty

Popularity Does Not Equal Legitimacy: Debunking the PQ's Charter of Myths

As expected, the provincial government's proposed Charter of Quebec Values contains a highly problematic ban on religious symbols or attire for all public sector employees. The Charter's supporters argue that it is necessary to protect the religious neutrality of the Quebec state, but that argument is based on a number of faulty premises, such as: The state cannot be religiously neutral if public employees wear religious items; religious identity can be "turned off" during business hours; religious symbols in the workplace undermine gender equality and that certain Catholic symbols in public institutions are cultural or historical, but faith-based accessories worn by public employees are religious.